2017-2018

Science and Technology (SCI)

Courses

SCI 550. Biological Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will address how biological characters and concepts are illustrated through various kinks of imaging technologies. Using plants as examples, morphological and anatomical characters at both macro- and micro- levels will be illustrated and interpreted through various imaging technologies, and their biological and environmental significance will be also discussed. This course will provide you with a basic overview of imaging technologies and their applications in the biological sciences, particularly in relation to scientific publications and reports. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on practice of these technologies, resulting in a portfolio of completed projects. Students will be grouped to complete final products generating publishable biological imaging on research samples. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of instructor is required.

SCI 551. Instrumental Analysis for Environmental and Life Sciences. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will cover the principles behind a variety of instrumental analytical techniques that are in use in the environmental and life sciences. The principles behind techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), mass spectrometry (MS), infrared and UV spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography will be discussed. These topics will be explored in relation to their utility in answering scientific problems in the environmental and life sciences. Students will develop a theoretical knowledge of the principles of various chemical analysis instrumentation and how it can be applied to environmental and biological problems. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 552. Innovation and Global Energy Challenges. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the challenges of providing a sustainable energy supply to support increasing world population and growing economies, and will focus on global energy systems, renewable energy sources, distributed power networks, diversification of energy supply, and increased energy efficiency. By examining the energy issues that preoccupy world decision makers, such as dwindling fuel resources, deteriorating electrical grids, externalization of costs, subsidies for existing energy corporations, extreme pollution and environmental degradation associated with mining, drilling, transport, operations, and waste disposal, students will develop an international perspective and multidisciplinary frame with which to approach needed changes in direction. Innovative approaches are needed throughout the entire energy distribution system, including changes in fuel procurement, processing, usage, and cost analyses that account for the entire fuel cycle and minimization of external costs. Breakthroughs in control systems, materials management, green building technology, carbon sequestration techniques, and algal biofuel production are just a few examples of promising new avenues for energy developments that will be assessed. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 553. GIS Tools Coastal Planning and Climate Change. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides background and training in the utilization of Geographic Information System (GIS) tools for tracking climate change effects on coastal ecosystems, with a particular emphasis on how coastal planners can predict the extent and likelihood of significant alteration of coastline geomorphonology or ecosystem dynamics. Advance planning can reduce the impact of these chagnes on residents and natural inhabitants. Case studies of coastal regions around the world will be explored. This is a 500 level graduate course.

SCI 554. Conservation in the U.S. and China. 3 Credit Hours.

As one of the major environmental issues, conservation captures the attention of both scientists and the general public. National parks in the U.S. and China preserve spectacular examples of the best biological and geological resources on our planet. This course provides basic scientific information behind these natural wonders and presents and analyzes conservation issues using an interdisciplinary approach. Through reading, discussion, and lectures, students will gain insights into the critical role that national parks play in the preservation of natural resources, as well as protecting cultural and historic values. Using selected national parks as case examples, students will learn how to assess scientific data underlying environmental debates and will examine how these issues are connected to society and business. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 555. Environmental Policy Decision Making and Problem Solving. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will present an overview of environmental policy alternatives, emphasizing the interrelationship of science, business, and government in policy formation and implementation. Global issues will be included, with special attention directed toward international efforts to achieve consensus on sustainable growth policies that encompass economic realities, technological innovation and a sensible legal and regulatory framework. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 557. Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment. 3 Credit Hours.

The generation of hazardous wastes and our potential exposure to them is increasing. This course will provide the student with the fundamentals of hazardous substances and wastes in relation to chemistry, environmental chemical processes, and toxicology. It is designed for students who are interested in various aspects of hazardous substances and wastes, including regulation, treatment, remediation, biological effects, chemical phenomena, transport, source reduction, and research. Experimental exercises will be integrated throughout the course to reinforce lecture topics. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

SCI 558. Global Change and Geochemical Impacts. 3 Credit Hours.

The course provides an in-depth understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere in the past and present. Using both geological and biological records, the course examines the evidence that depicts the environmental impacts of global changes, especially climate changes. Using molecular isotope technology and its research applications in the environmental sciences, the course covers both theoretical and experimental aspects of issues at the global scale. Current issues in geological, paleobiological, and organic geochemical applications will be examined, with a focus on global changes and how isotope techniques are used in different scientific disciplines to characterize and quantify these patterns. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 559. Foundations in Pharmaceutical Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to provide an advanced introduction and coherent overview of pharmaceutical science concepts for students interested in pharmaceutical and medical science, including the fundamental principles that underlie all disciplines in the pharmaceutical sciences, along with an understanding of the field of pharmacology and the process by which laboratory research findings are transformed into usable products. This is a 500 level graduate course. Instructor permission maybe required.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

SCI 562. Plant Diversity in Ancient and Modern Environments. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the origin and diversity of plants and their key role in shaping ancient and modern environments. Plants are the main "producers" in the Earth's ecosystems and are the major proxy for studies of environmental change. The course will provide detail about the major plant groups, and an in-depth understanding of the origin, evolution, and diversification of these groups. Through examining the change of global vegetation through temporal and spatial transitions, and the role of plants in shaping, adapting, and recording ancient and modern environments, the co-evolution between plants and global environment will be covered. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 563. Issues in Environmental Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an understanding of current environmental problems and a familiarity with innovative developments to solve them. Current issues from the following subject areas will be discussed: climate change, energy, land degradation, air and water quality, population growth, resource depletion, and wildlife management. Guest speakers will describe their work and provide insight on specific environmental issues and the future of the environmental science field. Students will research proposed solutions to various current environmental problems and evaluate the potential effectiveness of their approaches. This is a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

SCI 564. Biomarkers and Isotope Signals. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth understanding of state-of-the-art isotope technologies and their applications in the environmental sciences. Both theoretical and experimental aspects will be examined, with an emphasis on current issues surrounding compound- specific isotope geochemistry, and how these isotope techniques are used in different scientific disciplines and their impact on a student's future environmental career also will be emphasized. Additionally, the course will explore how technical skills and knowledge about isotope chemistry can be utilized in different environmental assessments. This is a 500 level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

SCI 565. Green Technology for Sustainability. 3 Credit Hours.

Chemical Processes provide valuable products and materials in various industries ranging from health care to transportation and food processing, yet they generate substantial quantities of wastes and emissions, which cost tens of millions of dollars annually to safely manage. This course investigates cost-effective utilization of chemical processes in ways that minimize pollution at the source and reduce impact on health and the environment, by creating sustainable systems in manufacturing, transportation, building, and energy production. Environmental risk-based costs and benefits are also explored, including the rationale, benefits, and implementation problems of green technology innovations. Experimental exercises will be integrated into the course to reinforce lecture topics.
Prerequisites: One 200-level and one 300-level course in environmental science or permission of the instructor and junior standing. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 566. Global Health Challenges. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the unique global health challenges we are facing today. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the status of health worldwide has begun to decline. This course will present some of the complexities facing the global health community from a variety of perspectives. A brief history of global health will be given, with particular attention to environmental degradation, especially the correlation between these changes and adverse effects on health and disease transmission. Social issues including literacy and cultural values will also be discussed in relation to effects on health. Selected communicable diseases and zoonotic and emerging diseases will be highlighted, along with current efforts to stop the spread of these diseases within the global community. Selected epidemiological studies will be emphasized to ensure that students are able to comprehend and appraise research in this field. This is a 500 level graduate content course.

SCI 570. Immunity and Disease. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide a broad introduction to the rapidly advancing study of immunity and disease. Starting with a survey of basic immunological principles, the course will explore the importance of the molecular and cellular factors involved in immune responses. Key methodologies used by immunologists and the practical applications of this research for the medical community will be discussed, including the role of immunity in cancer treatment and the causes of autoimmune disorders. This is a 500 level graduate course and permission of the instructor is required.

SCI 590. Research Directed Study. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to assist graduate students in designing research experiments, identifying technology and instrumentation necessary to support the experimentation, conducting and verifying initial pilot studies, and exploring possible funding sources. The course will culminate in the submission of the graduate student's proposal for graduate research project to his/her thesis committee, along with a summary of equipment and supply needs to support the research project.

SCI 690. Thesis I Thesis Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended for graduate students carrying out thesis research, in conjunction with the Master of Global Environmental Studies, under the guidance of the Thesis Committee. This is the first part, 3 credits, toward the 6 credit hour thesis research requirement. During the course of both courses students will complete the laboratory experiments, analyze experimental data and findings, prepare and submit the thesis, and complete the oral defense.

SCI 691. Thesis II Thesis Research Thesis and Oral Defense. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended for graduate students carrying out thesis research, in conjunction with the Master of Science in Global Environmental Studies, under the guidance of the Thesis Committee. This is the second part, 3 credit hours, toward the 6 credit hour research requirement. During the course of both courses, students will complete the laboratory experiments, analyze experimental data and findings, prepare and submit the Thesis, and complete the oral defense.

SCI 692. Graduate Practicum. 3 Credit Hours.

Graduate education is enhanced by practical application of its learned material. Thus, this course is designed to provide practical experience in some setting, scholarly or professional, related to global environmental studies. That experience can be in either a for-profit or a not-for-profit organization. The Practicum is intended to provide the student with an opportunity to acquire in-field knowledge and experience. Because academic credit is awarded for this experience, the student must gain academic knowledge as well as practical experience. The Graduate Practicum must be approved by the instructor, the MSGES program director, and the department chair.
Prerequisites: Student must have completed six hours of graduate coursework in Global Environmental Studies before taking the Graduate Practicum.

SCI 697. Directed Study in Science and Technology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course permits the student to pursue an area of interest and relevancy in global environmental studies and/or sustainability. The work will be performed under the supervision of a faculty member who will help design the program of study and the requirements to be met by the student. All directed studies must be approved by the Graduate Director and the Chair of the Department, who will be supplied with a title for and description of the course, its requirements and grading criteria, and a preliminary list of readings. This course is a 600-level graduate course. Permission of the instructor is required.