2016-2017

Global Studies

Mission Statement

The Global Studies program prepares students with the understanding of other countries, cultures, and global interactions necessary to succeed in the modern interconnected world. Majors learn key facts, terms, and background information on critical issues, so that they can understand primary documents, the popular press, and academic literature. Students move beyond seeing global challenges and opportunities as simply current events or as a series of disconnected cases by examining theories and conceptual models used to organize, explain, and predict events. Majors learn the research methods of the field, so that they can produce their own analysis of public policy issues and cultural interactions, thereby enabling them to conduct independent research.

Major in Global Studies

Students completing the Global Studies major (B.A.) will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Define or describe, and apply key concepts, specific facts, and critical issues of other countries, cultures, and global interactions.
  • Use conceptual models and theories to analyze global events and decisions.
  • Identify, discuss, and employ the methods used in global studies research
  • Make convincing arguments, employing an interdisciplinary framework, that are supported by evidence and reasoning.

Global Studies is a liberal arts major that prepares students to become effective leaders and citizens in today’s rapidly changing world. Modern economies are shaped by factors such as rising trade levels, multinational corporations, and global economic institutions. National and personal security are influenced by global events. The cultures of the world are linked and ideas can flow globally in an instant. No single academic discipline can cover all aspects of these global realities, but careful multidisciplinary study can give students the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and succeed in this interconnected world.

The major’s three required introductory courses provide students with important core knowledge and skills that will be developed in their advanced courses. Introduction to Global Politics establishes key concepts, terms, and theories with a focus on recent global issues and controversies. Introduction to Global Anthropology exposes students to other cultures and explores the impact of cultural interaction. World History since 1500 provides a sweep of major global events to explore factors shaping particular countries’ development and to show how key political, economic, and cultural trends have shaped the modern global system.

Majors choose one of three content tracks (Global Politics, Global Economics or Global Cultural Interaction) depending on their interests and goals. These tracks assure coherence, so that students can build information and skills from one course to the next. All of these courses are at the 300 or 400 level to provide intellectual challenge and reinforce concepts developed in earlier courses. Each track includes courses from at least three disciplines to provide access to a wide range of academic discourse and allow holistic study of particular issues that cross disciplinary lines.

Students also take three elective courses to enhance their global knowledge. There is a wide variety of approved knowledge electives so individuals can make a choice of depth or breadth in their course selection. A student particularly interested in Latin America might take history, political science, literature, or language courses to intensively explore that region. Another student might prefer a broader knowledge base and take courses in Latin American history, Middle East politics, and African culture. The merits of one choice versus another would depend on the individual student and her goals.

To aid their understanding of other cultures, majors must demonstrate competency in a modern foreign language either by passing an Intermediate II (MLXX206) course at Bryant, or by placing into an ML-300 level or above course on a language placement exam.

The major culminates with the Seminar on Global Issues in which advanced students read and critically analyze recent academic literature focusing on an important global theme such as globalization or empires. Each student also examines a particular global issue or policy problem as part of a semester-long research project.

One way to expand global knowledge and understanding is to acquire firsthand experience overseas. Majors are therefore encouraged, but not required, to study abroad. They must, however, complete their required and content courses at Bryant, and can count a maximum of two foreign courses as knowledge electives.

There is no preset order for completing the required, content area, and knowledge courses, but students are encouraged to meet with faculty to develop coherent individual programs. Majors are also strongly encouraged to complete additional courses from these offerings, which can be counted toward graduation as mode of thought courses or liberal arts electives.

Global Studies courses develop valued skills in analytic thinking, decision-making, and communication. Global Studies majors are equipped for success throughout their professional lives in fields such as government service, business, education, and journalism, or to pursue advanced study in several fields, such as history, international relations, political science, anthropology, and development.

Concentration in Global Studies

Students completing the Global Studies concentration will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Define or describe, and apply key concepts, specific facts, and critical issues of other countries, cultures, and global interactions.
  • Use conceptual models and theories to analyze global events and decisions.
  • Identify, discuss, and employ the methods used in global studies research.
  • Make convincing arguments, employing an interdisciplinary framework, that are supported by evidence and reasoning.

The Global Studies concentration at Bryant is an 18 credit liberal arts concentration that can only be completed along with a College of Business concentration or a major in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Global Studies concentrators complete required courses in global politics and anthropology, and a senior seminar that allows students to explore topics in depth. Students also choose electives from approved course listings in several departments: Communication, Economics, English and Cultural Studies, and History and Social Sciences.

Concentrators must demonstrate intermediate-level proficiency in a modern foreign language. (See the discussion of this requirement under the Global Studies major for details.)

Global Studies Minor

Global Studies is an interdisciplinary major and minor in the College of Arts and Sciences that prepares students with the understanding of other countries, cultures and global interactions. Students move beyond seeing global challenges and opportunities as simply current events or as a series of single cases by examining theories and conceptual models used to organized, explain and predict events. Global Studies Majors and Minors examine the world from the perspective of citizens, movements and everyday realities using on the ground research methods of the field (rather than viewing interactions from the top-down) so that they can produce their own analyses of public policy issues and cultural interactions, thereby enabling them to conduct independent research.

Courses

GLOB 241. Introduction to Global Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the field of global politics, also known as international relations. It focuses on a variety of interconnected topics, including the development of the nation-state system and political interactions among countries over issues of war and peace, human rights, and economic and environmental policies. We also explore the evolution and work of international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and non-governmental international organizations such as environmental and human rights groups. This course is cross-listed with POLS 241.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2017GLOB 241A3164MWF9:00am - 9:50am(J. Hamill)
Spring 2017GLOB 241B3166TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Clarke)
Spring 2017GLOB 241C3168TTh9:30am - 10:45am(E. Copeland)
Spring 2017GLOB 241D3170TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(N. Freiner)

GLOB 242. Introduction to Global Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies the consequences of globalization for human beings as they come to understand and value themselves, their relations to others, and their "place in the world." Students discuss a number of challenges to traditional concepts of "culture" important to understanding an anthropological approach to the concept of globalization. The course approaches "globalization," the movement of information, goods, services, capital and people throughout the global space, from a variety of perspectives, including discussion of global migration and diaspora and consideration of the globalization of media. This course is cross-listed with LCS 242.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2017GLOB 242B3309MWF10:00am - 10:50am(A. Perullo)
Spring 2017GLOB 242C3311TTh9:30am - 10:45am(W. Graves)
Spring 2017GLOB 242D3313TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(W. Graves)

GLOB 243. Honors: The Anthropology of Globalization. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, students interpret global transformations through studying anthropological texts and films that provide in-depth analysis of local-level instances of globalization. These ethnographic studies allow students to improve their specific knowledge of people and places throughout the world and also to develop more theoretically rigorous approaches toward explaining what is meant by the term globalization. To this end, students examine, among other themes, ethnicity to better comprehend issues of power, resources, and land in conflict situations; the movement of textiles to recognize post-Fordist social and economic practices; human trafficking to conceptualize commodification of the human body; and refugee migrations to understand transnationalism. In short, this course offers micro-level case studies, methods, and approaches toward learning about and explaining broad social and cultural processes. Students who receive credit for LCS 242/GLOB 242 cannot receive credit for this course. This course is cross-listed with LCS 243.
Prerequisites: Honors Program
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2017GLOB 243HN3385MWF9:00am - 9:50am(A. Perullo)

GLOB 271. World History Since 1500. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an historical study of the major regions and cultures of the world during the last five centuries, with attention to their connections and interactions and to the development of global trends. Political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural factors will be considered, and special emphasis will be placed on the emergence and the challenges of the peoples of the "third world". One theme will be an analysis of the processes of "modernization". This course is cross-listed with HIS 271.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2017GLOB 271A3174MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(P. Lokken)
Spring 2017GLOB 271B3176MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(P. Lokken)

GLOB 290. Honors Politics of the Global System. 3 Credit Hours.

This honors course explores the current global political system. It examines major historical developments that shaped the actors and power distribution of the current system. Next, it explores competing international relations theories that attempt to explain the main motivations and realities guiding the behavior of actors in the system. Then, it focuses on contemporary issues with global implications. Subsequently, it examines recent and future challenges faced by particular key actors in the system as they attempt to shape the global system of the future. It concludes by returning to the system level to consider the prospects for global cultural clashes or peace through globalization. Students receiving credit for GLOB 241/POLS 241, Introduction to Global Politics, cannot receive credit for this course. This course is cross-listed with POLS 290.
Prerequisites: Honors Program
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2017GLOB 290HN3162MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Dietrich)

GLOB 391. Internship in Global Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Students learn the practical application of theories, principles, and skills derived from their course work in global studies in a work environment. Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements in which they must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, research global literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantive report which blends their internship experience and the library research they have conducted.

GLOB 397. Directed Study in Global Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the global studies faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project.

GLOB 490. Seminar on Global Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

This senior seminar is designed as an interdisciplinary capstone course for students in the Global Studies concentration or major. It will include an in-depth examination of an important global issue such as economic development, the population problem, or international security. Each student will study a particular global issue or policy problem and present it to the seminar as part of a semester-long research project.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 and GLOB 242/LCS 242 or GLOB 243/LCS 243 and senior standing
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

GLOB 497. Directed Study in Global Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the global studies faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project.