2017-2018

Politics and Law

Mission Statement

The major in Politics and Law prepares students for a world shaped by political and legal questions and decisions. Majors learn key facts, terms, and background information on critical political and legal issues, so that they can understand primary documents, academic literature, and coverage of these issues in the popular press. They are exposed to the many dimensions of politics and the law as social phenomena: their origins, evolution, functions, and effects. Students examine the theories and conceptual models used to describe, explain, and predict events, so that they move beyond seeing political and legal events as simply a series of disconnected cases. Majors learn the research methods of the field, so that they can produce their own analysis of public policy issues, explanations of how law operates in society, and independent research.

Major in Politics and Law

Students completing the Politics and Law major will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Define or describe key concepts, specific facts, and critical issues of U.S. and global politics and law, and correctly apply this information to particular examples.
  • Use conceptual models and theories to analyze political and legal events and decisions.
  • Identify and discuss the methods used in political science and legal studies research.
  • Apply political and legal science methods in making convincing arguments supported by evidence and reasoning.

Today’s world is shaped by political and legal questions and decisions. Recent decades have seen the expansion of governmental power and its reach into economic, social, and moral spheres. Meanwhile, globalization and other developments have made economies, cultures, and political systems subject to daily international challenges and opportunities. Those who study and appreciate the factors shaping modern realities will surely outpace those who do not. Additionally, political and legal knowledge allows majors to move from being political spectators to active citizens who know how to shape decisions and contribute to a successful democratic society.

The Politics and Law major unites the complementary disciplines of Political Science and Legal Studies. The major includes six required courses. In Political Science, students take one course from each of three of the discipline’s major subfields, namely, American government, comparative politics, and international politics. From Legal Studies, the required courses introduce students to a variety of legal issues, but also provide insights into the ways that law is shaped by cultural forces, social change, intellectual debate, and historical developments.

Students then choose three electives in the major, at least one at the 400 level, drawn from upper level Political Science and Legal Studies courses. Majors are strongly encouraged to complete additional courses from these offerings, which can be counted toward graduation as mode of thought courses or liberal arts electives. Students should note that LGLS 211 is designated as a business course, so electing this course may limit students’ flexibility in choosing other business electives.

The major culminates with the Seminar in Politics and Law. This Capstone course provides majors with a distinctive experience that engages them in careful reading and discussion of key academic literature, and allows them to work intensively with the instructor to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice.

Legal Studies and Political Science courses develop valued skills in analytic thinking, decision-making, and communication. Politics and Law majors are equipped for success throughout their professional lives in fields such as government service, business, education, the nonprofit sector, journalism, and public administration, or they can pursue advanced study in law or other fields such as international relations, political science, or public administration.

Political Science Concentration – Mission Statement

The concentration in Political Science allows students to go beyond a minor in preparing themselves for a world shaped by political questions and decisions.

Concentrators learn key facts, terms, and background information on critical political issues in at least two political science subfields, so that they can understand primary documents, academic literature, and coverage of these issues in the popular press. Students examine the theories and conceptual models used to describe, explain, and predict events, so that they move beyond seeing political events as simply a series of distinct cases. Concentrators learn the research methods of the field, so that they can produce their own analysis of public policy issues and independent research.  Bryant’s curriculum includes American politics, comparative politics, international relations, and political philosophy.

Political Science Concentration

Students completing the Political Science concentration will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Define or describe key concepts, specific facts, and critical political issues, and correctly apply this information to particular examples.

  • Use conceptual models and theories to analyze political events and decisions.

  • Identify and discuss the methods used in political science research.

  • Apply the methods of political science in making convincing arguments supported by evidence and reasoning.

Political Science Minor – Mission Statement

The minor in Political Science prepares students for a world shaped by political questions and decisions. Minors learn key facts, terms, and background information on critical political issues, so that they can understand primary documents, academic literature, and coverage of these issues in the popular press. Students examine the theories and conceptual models used to describe, explain, and predict events, so that they move beyond seeing political events as simply a series of distinct cases. Minors learn the research methods of the field, so that they can produce their own analysis of public policy issues and independent research.  Bryant’s curriculum includes American politics, comparative politics, international relations, and political philosophy.

Political Science Minor

Students completing the Political Science minor will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Define or describe key concepts specific facts, and critical political issues, and correctly apply this information to particular examples.

  • Use conceptual models and theories to analyze political events and decisions.

  • Identify and discuss the methods used in political science research.

  • Apply the methods of political science in making convincing arguments supported by evidence and reasoning.

Legal Studies Minor – Mission Statement

The minor in Legal Studies exposes students to the study of “law in context.” Minors acquire familiarity with the ways in which law operates in society and the many facets of the law as a social phenomenon its origins, evolution, function, and effects. Furthermore, minors are exposed to practical skills needed to analyze legal phenomena and to investigate legal resources, broadly defined.

Legal Studies Minor

Students completing the Legal Studies minor will demonstrate the ability to:

  • Define or describe key concepts, specific facts, and critical issues of U.S. and international law, and to correctly apply this information to particular examples.
  • Use conceptual models and theories to analyze legal cases.

  • Identify and discuss the methods used in legal studies research.

  • Apply the methods of legal studies in making convincing arguments supported by evidence and reasoning.

The Legal Studies curriculum encourages an under- standing of ethical thinking in legal problem solving. The ability to engage in legal problem solving enhances personal analytical skills. Students can select courses that will prepare them for law school, give them information that will be valuable for a variety of careers in the United States and around the globe or simply offer a better understanding of law and government.

Legal Studies Courses

LGLS 211. The Legal Environment of Business. 3 Credit Hours.

This course emphasizes the nature of legal systems and processes. Topics include agency, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, debtor-creditor relationships, government regulation of business, and business structure (selection of a business entity).
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017LGLS 211A1124TTh8:00am - 9:15amTBD
Fall 2017LGLS 211AE1125M6:30pm - 9:10pm(R. Washburn)
Fall 2017LGLS 211B1126TTh9:30am - 10:45am(A. Boggio)
Fall 2017LGLS 211C1127MWF9:00am - 9:50amTBD
Fall 2017LGLS 211D1130MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(R. Washburn)
Fall 2017LGLS 211E1131MF2:00pm - 3:15pmTBD
Fall 2017LGLS 211F1132TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(A. Boggio)
Fall 2017LGLS 211FE1129W6:30pm - 9:10pm(C. Hall)
Fall 2017LGLS 211G1133TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(C. Hall)
Fall 2017LGLS 211H1134TTh3:30pm - 4:45pm(C. Hall)
Fall 2017LGLS 211I1135MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(R. Washburn)
Spring 2018LGLS 211A3117TTh8:00am - 9:15amTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211B3118MF2:00pm - 3:15pmTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211C3119MWF9:00am - 9:50amTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211CE3120T6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211D3121MWF11:00am - 11:50amTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211E3122MWF10:00am - 10:50am(R. Washburn)
Spring 2018LGLS 211F3123TTh3:30pm - 4:45pm(C. Hall)
Spring 2018LGLS 211FE3124W6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211G3126MWF12:00pm - 12:50pmTBD
Spring 2018LGLS 211HN3125MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(R. Washburn)
Summer 2018LGLS 211SE4103MW6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD

LGLS 220. Global Legal Traditions. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an introductory course to the field of legal studies. This is a course for students who want to “think big” about the law. It combines the traditional disciplines of comparative law, legal history, and legal philosophy. The purpose is to introduce students to understanding contemporary U.S. law by studying what it has been, how it differs from the laws of other countries, and what it is tending to become. The course places national laws in the broader context of major legal traditions, those of chthonic (or indigenous) law, talmudic law, civil law, Islamic law, common law, Hindu law and Confucian law. Each tradition is examined in terms of its institutions and substantive law, its founding concepts and methods, its attitude towards the concept of change and its teaching on relations with other traditions and peoples.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018LGLS 220A3127MWF11:00am - 11:50am(M. Bryant)

LGLS 351. Civil Rights and Liberties. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students examine the legal principles and rules that define the nature and limits of American government and the rights of citizens under the Constitution. The course stresses analysis of Supreme Court decisions and their influence on American political and economic development.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017LGLS 351A1136TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(C. Hall)
Spring 2018LGLS 351FE3128W6:30pm - 9:10pm(C. Hall)

LGLS 354. Communications Law. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the legal rights and privileges of communications media, this course emphasizes the following topics: written communications; the problems of right to know versus right of privacy; libel, defamation, copyright, and infringement; examination of regulatory agencies; and theories of the First Amendment.
Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017LGLS 354A1137MWF10:00am - 10:50am(R. Washburn)

LGLS 356. Law of the Internet. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we examine the methods of governing behavior in cyberspace from the United States and a global perspective. We begin with a study of the infrastructure of the Internet and its regulation. The legal principles inherent in the First Amendment, intellectual property, privacy and commerce are examined. We then apply these traditional legal principles to activities in cyberspace.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018LGLS 356AE3129M6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD

LGLS 357. Legal Philosophy and Reasoning. 3 Credit Hours.

There are numerous philosophies which underlie the law. They range from the view of law as morality discoverable through reason, to the perspective of law as a command by those in power. What does it mean to interpret a legal standard such as a statute or a case law? To what extent are judges legislating? Drawing connections between and among these issues will be the focus of this course.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

LGLS 360. Law and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the field of law and society. Students examine the nature of law and what we can and cannot expect it to do for us; the manner in which law and legal categories shape society; the role of lawyers, judges and other legal actors in the legal system; the basic structure of the judiciary and how cases flow through the court system, and controversial legal issues in such areas as business, medicine, and gender. Emphasis is placed on issues that illustrate the interaction between law and social control and law and social change. The course draws from a variety of perspectives including sociology, political science, history and philosophy. A major goal of the course is to give students a practical foundation in the critical assessment of law and legal thinking as well as improving their ability to make arguments in writing and orally.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017LGLS 360A1138MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(M. Bryant)
Spring 2018LGLS 360A3130MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(K. Alidadi)

LGLS 380. Sport and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Sport acts as a prism on society. Sport can reflect and forecast changes in our society on local, regional, national and international levels. These changes and their interrelationship with Sport are studied in this class.
Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018LGLS 380FE3131W6:30pm - 9:10pm(R. Washburn)
Winter 2018LGLS 380A2002MTWThFS8:30am - 11:30am(R. Washburn)

LGLS 381. Global Dimensions of Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and problems of international law and of the international legal system, and will cover the traditional major topics in this field such as the sources of international law, sovereignty, jurisdiction and responsibility of states, treaty law, non-intervention principles, the relationship between international law and national law, dispute resolution and international litigation. It will also address newer themes in international law such as the impact of international organizations and other "actors" in international law, human rights law, international criminal law, the use of force and terrorism, international environmental law, and the impact of religion and culture on international law. The course will review a number of important international law cases decided by both national and international tribunals, as well as treaties, resolutions and other international legal instruments of importance.
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

LGLS 382. Not for Profit Law and Governance. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores law, governance and public policy issues surrounding the not-for-profit segment of the US economy. It concerns the life cycle of various forms of not-for-profit entities recognized and regulated by the United States Code and otherwise, e.g. USC Section 501(c) Corporations: Trusts; Private Foundations and Mutual Benefit Societies, from formation to dissolution, examining the (relative merits of the relevant structures as well as the respective) duties and liabilities of directors, officers and employees. Through readings in legal and management texts, questions of public policy and the ethics of special privileges these entities enjoy in American society are examined.
Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220 or LGLS 360 or permission of the instructor
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

LGLS 383. Health Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course investigates how law regulates health and affects the health care industry, health care practitioners, patients, scientists, and other stakeholders. Each semester the topics included in the syllabus vary depending on what is currently debated. A list of topics for a past semester includes infectious disease, privacy, quarantine, FDA regulation, clinical trials, direct-to-consumer advertisement, medical tourism, reproductive health, rationing, abortion, end of life, and others.
Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate.

LGLS 386. History, Law, and the Holocaust. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore in depth the Holocaust and its impact on the development of international law after 1945. Topics will include anti-Semitism, the rise of Hitler, the Final Solution, minority rights, domestic legal actions against perpetrators, the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, Allied military courts, and subsequent national and international trials of accused Nazi war criminals. The course concludes with an examination of some of the leading post-Nuremberg topics in international human rights law today, including peremptory norms, transitional justice, hate speech prohibitions, and Holocaust denial.
Prerequisites: 200 level History course and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018LGLS 386A3095MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(M. Bryant)

LGLS 391. Legal Studies Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Legal Studies internships give students the opportunity for supervised employment in an area where they can apply legal studies theories and principles. Interns work at least ten hours a week, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, do research on their field of employment, and prepare a substantive report on work experience and research. Approval required by a supervising faculty member and the department chair. Junior standing is required.

LGLS 411. Markets and the Law: The Uniform Commercial Code. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an advanced look at some of the provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics include contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, and secured transactions. These topics are of particular concern to those who are interested in becoming accountants.
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

LGLS 412. Law of Financial Institutions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a study of the laws and regulations that govern U.S. financial institutions and the federal agencies that regulate those institutions. We analyze the creation and actions of the monetary system and capital markets. We examine the evolution of regulatory efforts and analyze current issues and challenges that face regulators and institutions going forward. In particular, we will examine the 2007-2008 meltdown of the mortgage, securities, banking and derivatives industries, and the federal actions (legislative and regulatory) undertaken in response to those crises, with a particular focus on the provisions of the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018LGLS 412A3132TTh12:30pm - 1:45pmTBD

LGLS 443. Legal Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

Thinking deeply about the nature of "the Good" is the starting point for investigating the purposes of law. To this end, Legal Ethics introduces the student to the leading ethical systems that have guided human thought about the Good. Using examples from both U.S. and international law, the course helps the student to integrate an understanding of ethical systems and theories of moral development into the study of law broadly considered. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content level course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and one 300-level Legal Studies course or permission of the instructor
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018LGLS 443A3133TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(A. Boggio)

LGLS 451. International Business Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will address both the broader issues of government control of international business and the process of doing business overseas. It will compare the unique culture and legal systems of the United States, Europe, Japan and the Middle East. In addition, the course will focus on the mechanics of doing business overseas under international agreements such as GATT, NAFTA and the European Union.
Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or permission of the instructor
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017LGLS 451A1141MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(K. Alidadi)
Fall 2017LGLS 451B1142MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(K. Alidadi)
Spring 2018LGLS 451A3134TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(C. Hall)
Spring 2018LGLS 451B3135TTh9:30am - 10:45am(C. Hall)

LGLS 490. Seminar in Politics and Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar is designed as an interdisciplinary capstone course for students in the Politics and Law major. It will include an in-depth examination of a selected theme in politics and law. Each student will work intensively with the instructor to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice, which will be presented to the entire seminar. This course is cross-listed with POLS 490.
Prerequisites: Politics and Law major and senior standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017LGLS 490A1100T3:30pm - 6:15pm(A. Boggio)

LGLS 497. Directed Study in Legal Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Under faculty supervision, students pursue a well defined area of interest in legal studies.
Prerequisites: LGLS 211 or LGLS 220 and permission of the instructor.

LGLS ST300. Law, Religion and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

The intersections of law and religion in society continue to spark discussion, dissent and conflict in the US and abroad. This course takes a broad comparative perspective to investigate issues of American and global concern where an understanding of the dynamics of religion, belief, spirituality and the state are essential. Working with primary and secondary sources from various jurisdictions, students learn about theories, sources, and key concepts as well as contemporary debates involving religious liberty in the US, under international law and in a select number of foreign jurisdictions. Topics include protection of religious freedom; religion and women’s rights; religion and the state; religion and criminal justice; religion and education; religion in the workplace; religion and health; religion and security; religion and business.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

LGLS ST400. Special Topics in Legal Studies Corporations Devils or Angels?. 3 Credit Hours.

“Corporations: Devils or Angels” is a special topic course designed to analyze, in an empirically informed way, the relationship between law and morality as well as law and the political, economic and cultural realms. The course focuses on corporations, which are legal entities created and regulated by state law: it traces their historical emergence, looks at the rights under the Constitution and examine impact of these legal entities on the economy, politics, and culture. One 300 level Legal Studies course and sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: 300 or 400-level Legal Studies course.

Political Science Courses

POLS 241. Introduction to Global Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the field of global politics, also known as international relations. It focuses on a variety of interconnected topics, including the development of the nation-state system and political interactions among countries over issues of war and peace, human rights, and economic and environmental policies. We also explore the evolution and work of international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and non-governmental international organizations such as environmental and human rights groups. This course is cross-listed with GLOB 241.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 241A1087TTh12:30pm - 1:45pmTBD
Fall 2017POLS 241B1091MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(J. Hamill)
Fall 2017POLS 241C1093TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Clarke)
Fall 2017POLS 241D1095MWF9:00am - 9:50am(J. Hamill)
Fall 2017POLS 241E1097MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(J. Hamill)
Spring 2018POLS 241A3087MWF9:00am - 9:50amTBD
Spring 2018POLS 241B3089MWF1:00pm - 1:50pmTBD
Spring 2018POLS 241C3091TTh9:30am - 10:45am(E. Copeland)
Spring 2018POLS 241D3093TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(N. Freiner)
Spring 2018POLS 241E3085MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 256. Government and Society in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an introductory course about the role of U.S. government in American society. After tracing the development of the U.S. Constitution, the course surveys a range of topics including Congress, the presidency, the Supreme Court, federalism, political parties and elections, interest groups, civil liberties, and civil rights. Contemporary domestic policy debates are also covered.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 256A1144TTh9:30am - 10:45am(M. Clarke)
Fall 2017POLS 256B1146MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(R. Holtzman)
Fall 2017POLS 256C1147MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(R. Holtzman)
Fall 2017POLS 256FE1145W6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD
Spring 2018POLS 256A3136TTh8:00am - 9:15amTBD
Spring 2018POLS 256B3137TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Clarke)
Spring 2018POLS 256C3138MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(R. Holtzman)
Spring 2018POLS 256D3139MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(R. Holtzman)

POLS 290. Honors Politics of the Global System. 3 Credit Hours.

This honors course explores the current global political system.It examines major historical developments that shaped the actors and power distribution of the current system. Next, it explores competing international relations theories that attempt to explain the main motivations and realities guiding the behavior of actors in the system. Then, it focuses on contemporary issues with global implications. Subsequently, it examines recent and future challenges faced by particular key actors in the system as they attempt to shape the global system of the future. It concludes by returning to the system level to consider the prospects for global cultural clashes or peace through globalization. Students receiving credit for POLS 241/GLOB 241, Introduction to Global Politics, cannot receive credit for this class. This course is cross-listed with GLOB 290.
Prerequisites: Honors Program
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 290HN1089MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 291. Honors Contemporary American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This honors course covers the ideas and historical factors that shaped the formation and evolution of the U.S. political system. It examines the main governmental and non-governmental players in the contemporary policy-making system and how they interact to create policy decisions. It explores some key ongoing policy debates. Additionally, it goes beyond book knowledge to examine contemporary, practical politics throughout the semester. Students receiving credit for POLS 256, Government and Society in America, cannot receive credit for this class.
Prerequisites: Honors program
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 351. United States Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course survey the instruments, implementation and issues of U.S. foreign policy. Students will learn about America's rise to power and its current role in the world with a focus both on how foreign policy is made and Post WWII U.S. involvements overseas.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018POLS 351A3140MWF11:00am - 11:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 352. The Politics of Government and Business in America. 3 Credit Hours.

What is the nature of the relationships that exist between government and business, politics and economy, power and money in the United States? And why do these relationships matter? In this course, we will use these questions as a starting-point from which to undertake a critical examination of these relationships as they exist today and to consider where they might be heading in the future, and to generate conclusions about their potential implications - political, economic, and social.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 352A1148MWF10:00am - 10:50am(R. Holtzman)

POLS 353. Political Parties and Elections. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the history of party politics, party organization, nominations and elections, voting, and the role of pressure groups, public opinion, and the media in the national electoral process. The course is offered in the fall semester of even numbered years when congressional and/or presidential elections take place.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 361. Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the key concepts, issues, and trends in comparative politics. Comparative politics focuses on the study of political organization and behavior using the method of comparison across time and between country cases. The course covers topics such as various types of political systems, political participation, economic development, and nationalist movements/identities. Types of countries covered include: established democracies, authoritarian regimes, communist, and developing countries.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 361A1149TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(E. Copeland)
Spring 2018POLS 361A3141TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(E. Copeland)

POLS 363. Latin American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Students explore the social and political foundations of Latin American societies, and their contemporary political institutions and practices. This course focuses on the varying roles played by political culture, the main political actors, foreign intervention, and developmental issues in Latin American politics.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

POLS 364. European Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the political, economic, and social systems of countries in Europe. It also analyses the process of integration that has created the European Union. Some of the themes examined include varying political systems, political participation, social movements, political parties, and government social policies, as well as issues raised by sharing power between individual countries and the EU. Countries examined will include some from Western, Central and Eastern Europe.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 365. The Middle East in War and Peace. 3 Credit Hours.

After tracing the rise of Arabism and Islam, this course examines how the modern Middle East was shaped by the influence of European colonialism. It then examines recent regional conflicts and their resolution, including: the Arab/Israeli wars, the Palestinian uprising, the Iran-Iraq war, and the Gulf war.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 365CE1150T6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD

POLS 366. Politics of Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course uses comparative methodology to analyze the government and domestic politics of India, China, and Japan. Students will be introduced to the political institutions and processes of the three countries, and explore the impact of history, cultural dynamics specific to Asia and South Asia, government structures and economic change on political processes. State-society relations are examined within the context of democratization, development, and citizen movements. Issues regarding cultural and scholarly lenses will be addressed through critical examination of relevant materials and theories discussed in class.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290, or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018POLS 366A3142TTh9:30am - 10:45am(N. Freiner)

POLS 367. Global Environmental Sustainability and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the intersection of global environmental sustainability issues, political policy, and the world economic issues. It focuses on different trajectories of environmental and ecological politics and thought, and on foundations for policy, with particular focus on climate change. The central premise is that deciding how to respond to climate change is a highly political process involving conflicts over competing values and interests, the growth of international institutions, and the link between climate change and the global economy.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 391. Political Science Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply political science theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with supervising a faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantive report on their internship experience and the studies involved.
Prerequisites: POLS 256 or POLS 291 or GLOB 241/POLS 241 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 and junior standing or approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair.

POLS 456. The Presidency in Modern American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

The image of the presidency today as the centerpiece of the American political system is very different than the one originally outlined in the U.S. Constitution. What has brought about this change? How has this transformation impacted the separation of powers and the respective roles of Congress and the Supreme Court? What does the popular image of the president as "chief decider" signify for a democratic system of government? These questions and more guide this course's exploration of the presidency in modern American politics. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018POLS 456A3143MWF10:00am - 10:50am(R. Holtzman)

POLS 462. International Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students analyze the nature of the modern nation/state system, and the resultant struggle for power, including power politics, balance of power, and war and peace. This course covers the bases and limitations of national power as well as international law, international organization and diplomacy. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 463. Ethics in International Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

"All's fair in love and war" used to effectively summarize global politics, but in recent years, moral considerations have become major, but still controversial, components of many policy discussions. This course will examine issues such as the ethical constraints on the use of force, human rights norms, issues created by global inequality and by development programs, and ethical implications of the global economy and multinational corporations. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 463A1152MWF11:00am - 11:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 464. Political Ideologies - Old and New. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines first the conflicting political philosophies of liberalism, conservatism, and Marxism which shaped the development of Western democracies and the former Communist countries, and then considers modern ideological debates over third world nationalism, environmentalism, and feminism.
Prerequisites: GLOB/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018POLS 464A3144TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(N. Freiner)

POLS 471. Russian and East European Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers an integrated look at East European and Russian politics primarily for juniors and seniors. We look at Bulgaria, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and the former "East Germany" (ex-GDR), Hungary and Poland. We also consider the Balkans including ex-Yugoslav successor states. Finally, we examine Russian domestic and foreign policy concentrating on the post-Soviet period.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

POLS 481. Politics of Developing Countries. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the political, economic, and social structures of the broad array of countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East that make up the developing world. The major challenges faced by these countries and strategies adopted to address them will be identified and analyzed. A historical overview of the evolution of the developing world will explore the impact of colonialism and issues of post-colonialism. Issues of gender, race, ethnicity, sustainable development and the environment will also be explored.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 483. Politics of International Economic Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the role of individual country governments, official international economic organizations, and globally-oriented non-governmental organizations (NGO's) in the international economic system. It examines conflict and cooperation among nations, as well as interactions between countries and international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization, as they engage in the management of trade, investment flows, exchange rates, debt, and the global environment. It also considers politics within individual countries as they affect that country's international economic policies, looking at governmental relations with business, labor associations and other non-governmental organizations as these impact on trade policies, exchange rates, and the regulation of multinational corporations' overseas operations.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 483A1151TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(E. Copeland)

POLS 490. Seminar in Politics and Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar is designed as an interdisciplinary capstone course for students in the Politics and Law major. It will include an in-depth examination of a selected theme in politics and law. Each student will work intensively with the instructor to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice, which will be presented to the entire seminar. This course is cross-listed with LGLS 490.
Prerequisites: Politics and Law major and senior standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 490A1101T3:30pm - 6:15pm(A. Boggio)

POLS 497. Directed Study in Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the political science faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project.
Prerequisites: varies by topic.