2017-2018

History (HIS)

Courses

HIS 250. Emergence of Europe (1000-1600). 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and early development of Europe from 1000-1600. Topics include the overall character and decline of feudalism, the rise of national monarchies, urbanism and society during the Renaissance and Reformation. Socioeconomic and cultural history is emphasized.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 252. Europe: 1500 to 1815. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a study of the political, intellectual, and social history of early modern Europe from 1500 to 1815, with emphasis on the institution of monarchy and on the reigns of famous kings and queens. Attention will also be given to the major transformations of the age including the scientific, English, and French Revolutions and their effects.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 252A1102TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(B. Edwards)
Fall 2017HIS 252CE1103T6:30pm - 9:10pm(D. Lux)

HIS 261. History of the United States to 1877. 3 Credit Hours.

A basic survey and introduction to the field of American history, this course conveys the political, cultural and economic development of the United States through Reconstruction. It provides an understanding of the foundation of the "American way of life".
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 261A1104TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(A. Joseph)
Fall 2017HIS 261B1105TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(A. Joseph)
Spring 2018HIS 261A3098MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(H. Hubbard)

HIS 262. History of the United States Since 1865. 3 Credit Hours.

A history of the American experience from the end of Reconstruction to the present, this course focuses on the Urban-Industrial age, the rise of the United States to world leadership, and the important changes that have occurred in the "American way of life" during the past century.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 262A1106MWF9:00am - 9:50am(H. Hubbard)
Fall 2017HIS 262B1107TTh8:00am - 9:15am(K. Daly)
Fall 2017HIS 262C1108MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(K. Daly)
Fall 2017HIS 262D1109MWF11:00am - 11:50am(H. Hubbard)
Spring 2018HIS 262A3099TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(J. Barrett Litoff)
Spring 2018HIS 262B3100MWF12:00pm - 12:50pmTBD
Spring 2018HIS 262C3101TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(A. Joseph)
Spring 2018HIS 262D3102TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(A. Joseph)

HIS 263. American Women's History. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students survey American women's history from colonial times to the present. The course shows how the major social, political, and economic developments in American history have affected women in the past. Students examine the lives of "ordinary" women, as well as those of leading women thinkers and activists.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 263A1110TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(J. Barrett Litoff)
Spring 2018HIS 263A3103TTh9:30am - 10:45am(J. Barrett Litoff)

HIS 270. World History to 1500. 3 Credit Hours.

This introductory survey course traces the development of humanity and society from the dawn of history to 1500, and provides insight into the wide spectrum of ideas, institutions, and life practices that different people and cultures around the world have created. Various representations of "civilizations" and "community" are considered.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 270A1111MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Estey)
Fall 2017HIS 270B1112MWF11:00am - 11:50am(J. Estey)
Spring 2018HIS 270A3104MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Estey)

HIS 271. World History Since 1500. 3 Credit Hours.

An historical study of the major regions and cultures of the world during the last five centuries, with attention to their connections and interactions and to the development of global trends. Political, economic social, intellectual, and cultural factors will be considered, and special emphasis will be placed on the emergence and the challenges of the people of the "third world". One theme will be an analysis of the processes of "modernization". This course is cross-listed with GLOB 271.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 271A3097MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(P. Lokken)
Spring 2018HIS 271B3083MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(P. Lokken)

HIS 272. Introduction to Latin American History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a basic survey of Latin American history from before the European invasions to the recent past. The course emphasizes both the diversity of the Latin American experience across time and space and the persistence of certain historical continuities in the region: intense political and cultural conflict, deep social and economic inequality, and longstanding domination by externally-based imperial and neo-imperial powers.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 272A1113MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(P. Lokken)
Fall 2017HIS 272B1114MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(P. Lokken)

HIS 273. History in the World Today. 3 Credit Hours.

The course requires students to formulate and support coherent arguments about complex historical problems in class discussions, essay exams, and writing projects. It strengthens students' global perspective by encouraging historical analysis of selected current world events and the U.S. relationship to/involvement in those events. By introducing students to historical methods and theory it enables them to understand more deeply one of the key disciplines associated with the humanities. This course is required for history majors and concentrators.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 273A1115MF2:00pm - 3:15pm(P. Lokken)

HIS 282. Introduction to American Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to key themes, concepts, and debates in American Studies. Students use a foundation in American Studies methodology to interpret a range of materials and develop a richer understanding of the United States, its cultures, and its peoples. Objects of study may include literary texts, films, historical documents, music, visual art, and products of popular culture. Specific course topics may vary. This course is cross-listed with LCS 282.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 282A1082MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(K. Daly)

HIS 351. History of Modern Europe: 1815 to the Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the major political, economic and intellectual developments since 1815. It emphasizes the significant events, patterns, and themes in Western history within the context of the modern world.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 351A1116MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(J. Estey)
Spring 2018HIS 351A3105MWF11:00am - 11:50am(J. Estey)

HIS 354. Trends in Modern Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a selected history of modern and post-modern themes, ideologies and values in Euro-America (Western civilization) since the Renaissance. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing social, political and philosophical questions and writings in context. The thematic focus of the course (e.g., individualism) may change from year to year.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 354A1117MWF10:00am - 10:50am(M. Bryant)
Fall 2017HIS 354HN1118MWF11:00am - 11:50am(M. Bryant)
Spring 2018HIS 354A3106MWF10:00am - 10:50am(M. Bryant)

HIS 361. Gender and World War II. 3 Credit Hours.

Early in 1943, Max Lerner, the well-known author and journalist, writing for the New York newspaper, PM, predicted that "when the classic work on the history of women comes to be written, the biggest force for change in their lives will turn out to have been war." This course explores the question of whether or not World War II served as a major force for change in the lives women, both in the United States and around the globe. The experiences of a broad socio-economic and ethnic cross-section of wartime women are examined. In addition to the United States, areas of the world examined include women in China, France, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, Germany, and/or Italy.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 361A1709TTh9:30am - 10:45am(J. Barrett Litoff)

HIS 362. The United States in the 1960's. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the main contours of political, economic, social, and cultural life during the 1960's. Special areas of focus include: the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement, the resurgence of conservatism, the demise of the New Deal Coalition, the emerging women's liberation movement, the effect of social and cultural movements on business, and the intersection of artistic and cultural expressions with politics. The relationship of popular mythology and collective memories concerning the 1960's with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another key area of concern.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 362A3107MWF10:00am - 10:50amTBD

HIS 364. History of American Technology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course treats the history of technology in the contexts of American business and social history. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, the course first places technological change within the context of larger developments in American history. From that basis, the course then moves on to deal with the impact of technology in American social institutions, business, and culture.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 364AE1119M6:30pm - 9:10pm(G. Mohanty)
Spring 2018HIS 364A3108MWF9:00am - 9:50amTBD

HIS 365. The United States and World Politics, 1890 to the Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and development of the United States as a great world power from the Spanish-American War to the post Cold War era. Focusing on the connections between international and domestic events, the course evaluates the role of the US as a global power over the past century.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 365A1120TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(J. Barrett Litoff)

HIS 366. Race in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines major issues in race relations from the perspective of both black and white Americans from the onset of slavery to the present. The course examines the origins and functioning of American slavery, with consideration to the Atlantic slave trade and the role of U.S. slavery within the context of New World slavery; the relationship between European immigrants and African-Americans in terms of the formation of whiteness and the historical meaning of white skin privilege ; abolitionism and antislavery; the development and functioning of Jim Crow segregation; 2nd Reconstruction; the civil rights movement; and the significance of race during the post civil rights era. This course is cross-listed with SOC 366, Race in America.
Prerequisites: SOC 251 and 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 366A1098TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(A. Joseph)

HIS 367. The History of American Popular Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the historical context of various expressions of American popular culture in a variety of media, including: literature, film, radio, television, music, performance, advertising, style and fashion, food, and the internet. It examines the meaning of popular culture to its audiences and the way those audiences use and transform cultural products as part of their everyday lives. Attention is given to popular culture's relationship to "high culture," to economics and commerce, and to social and political developments including, but not limited to the emergence of working-class culture, the Great Depression, the Cold War and McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and the Women's Liberation Movement.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Winter
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 368. Gender and American Culture in the 1950s. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students the opportunity to examine the cultural complexities of the 1950s and to appreciate it as a period of conservatism and restraint as well as a time of notable social change for women. It uses the enormously popular I Love Lucy television series (1951-1957) and Betty Friedan's classic work, The Feminine Mystique (1963), as well as related readings, to show how many women of the fifties challenged the stereotype of domestic, quiescent, suburban womanhood as they engaged in multifarious and diverse activities that helped pave the way for the social protest movements of the 1960s.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course and Sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 368A3109TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(J. Barrett Litoff)

HIS 369. U.S. Latin American Relations 1820 to Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of relations between the United States and the nations of Latin America from the era of the Monroe Doctrine to the present.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Winter 2018HIS 369A2011MTWThFS1:00pm - 4:00pmTBD

HIS 371. History of Russia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an historical study of the evolution of Russian society from the Age of Kiev to the present including the era of the tsars and the Soviet period. Special attention is given to the contemporary situation in Russia.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017HIS 371A1121TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(J. Estey)

HIS 372. History of East Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course consists of an historical study of the ideas and institutions of the countries of East Asia with primary focus on developments in China in ancient times and in the modern era since 1800. Contemporary problems are also discussed.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

HIS 373. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides background for an analysis of some of the major problems of contemporary African life. Topics include the ancient culture of Africa, the slave trade, colonialism, African nationalism, and current political, economic and social trends in Africa.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018HIS 373A3111TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(J. Estey)

HIS 375. History of Modern Japan. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a survey and examination of Japanese history from its beginnings to the twentieth century, and includes a consideration of political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of Japanese traditions and values and their sources, and also on the history and practices of Japanese business. A major portion of the course will deal with the modern period and Japan's successes and failures as a modern nation.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

HIS 376. Cultures and Economies in Transition. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar will explore the origins and evolving complexities of the enormous cultural and economic transformations that are underway in the Newly Independent States (NIS). In particular, it will carefully situate the ongoing economic transformation within a broader cultural, historical, and political context. Special emphasis will be placed on how the rapid collapse of the Soviet Union's command economy, and the resulting cuts in defense spending, have created critical problems for both the West and the Newly Independent States. This course is cross-listed with ECO 376, Cultures and Economies in Transition.
Prerequisites: ECO 114 and 200 level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 377. Gandhi and Mandela. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of the ideas and the political careers of two great 20th century national leaders: M.K. Gandhi of India, and Nelson Mandela of South Africa. Attention will also be given to the modern and contemporary history of their respective nations, and especially to the social and political systems which these men tried to change.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Winter
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 377A3112MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(J. Estey)

HIS 386. History, Law, and the Holocaust. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore in depth the Holocaust and its impact on the development of international law after 1945. Topics will include anti-Semitism, the rise of Hitler, the Final Solution, minority rights, domestic legal actions against perpetrators, the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, Allied military courts, and subsequent national and international trials of accused Nazi war criminals. The course concludes with an examination of some of the leading post-Nuremberg topics in international human rights law today, including peremptory norms, transitional justice, hate speech prohibitions, and Holocaust denial.
Prerequisites: 200 level history course and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 386A3094MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(M. Bryant)

HIS 391. History Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply history theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantial report on their internship experience and the studies involved. This course is limited to juniors and seniors and requires the approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair.

HIS 451. The World Since 1945. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines major developments in global history since 1945, considering topics such as the capitalist and socialist world-systems, the Cold War, imperialism, and third world independence movements, and the so-called "new world order." Special emphasis is placed on the interaction between Western and non-Western societies.
Prerequisites: 200 level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS 451A1122MF2:00pm - 3:15pm(B. Edwards)
Summer 2018HIS 451S4102MTWThF11:00am - 12:30pmTBD

HIS 452. History of Modern Britain. 3 Credit Hours.

In this advanced course students trace the history of Great Britain from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the present, concentrating on cultural history and utilizing a socio-political perspective. Themes include the development of capitalism, constitutionalism, industrialism and imperialism, and the impact of the British expressions of these forces on modern globalization.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 452A3113MWF12:00pm - 12:50pmTBD

HIS 453. History of Modern Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents a history of the modern natural sciences from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, treating the development of modern physics, chemistry, geology, and biology. Students need no special background in science. The course focuses on conceptual problems and the culture of science rather than on the content of science. Examples of special topics include the development of the Newtonian world-view, the challenges of relativity and the quantum, how alchemy led to modern chemistry, why so many early geologists were churchmen, and how Darwinian evolution differed from other nineteenth-century evolutionary theories. The course is geared to the capabilities of students without specialized background in history and science.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 453AE3114M6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD

HIS 461. History of Contemporary America. 3 Credit Hours.

An intensive examination of the forces and events that have shaped the recent American past, this course stresses domestic politics, social change, urbanization, civil rights and modern ecological problems.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018HIS 461A3115TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(A. Joseph)

HIS 463. The United States in the 1970s and 1980s. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the major political, social, cultural, and economic shifts in American life during the 1970s and the 1980s. Special areas of focus include the ascendancy of conservatism, the retreat of liberalism, rising economic inequality, women's and gay liberation, the expanding role of the media in American politics, the veneration of corporate America, and expressions of such in the era's popular (and sometimes unpopular) culture. The relationship of popular history and collective memory of the 1970s and 1980s with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another area of emphasis. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 464. The United States and China 1931 through 1950. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the cultural, political and military dimensions of the complicated wartime alliance between the United States and China during the World War II era. It focuses on the period from the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in September 1931 until early 1950 when the Chinese government seized the U.S. consulate in Beijing after the refusal of the United States to recognize the People's Republic of China. Students explore both primary and secondary sources as they untangle the multifaceted relationship between the United States and China during this critical era. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: 200 level history and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 490. Seminar in Historical Inquiry. 3 Credit Hours.

For seniors concentrating in History, this seminar provides extensive, practical experience in the craft of historical research and writing. Further, it examines select themes in historiographical and/or philosophical debates concerning history as a special type of knowledge. Requirements include a substantial research paper. Permission of instructor and HIS 273 are required.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 497. Directed Study in History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the history department. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project. Permission of department chair and faculty member is required.

HIS ST300. Special Topics in History Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World. 3 Credit Hours.

A history of race and slavery in the Atlantic World between the 15th and 19th centuries, with a particular emphasis on the economic, social, and cultural impact of the trans-atlantic trade in enslaved Africans (a crucial component of 'globalization" during that era) on the development of European-ruled societies in the Americas.
Prerequisites: 200-level History course.

Spring 2018HIS ST300A3110MF2:00pm - 3:15pm(P. Lokken)

HIS ST301. Sp.Tp. in His. Patronage and Culture Social and Economic Foundations of Italian Art and Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.

This special topics course focuses on the role of patronage in producing the cultural heritage of Italian art and architecture. The course has two parts: First, an on-campus component that furnishes a broad history of Italy along with a more focused treatment of developments in art and architecture during key periods. Second, this course leads to completion of a student research project that may be completed during an optional field experience in Italy (8-10 days carried out during the Bryant spring break). Admission to the course is by application only.
Prerequisites: 200-level History course.

HIS ST302. Special Topics in History The Struggle For Educational Access, Opportunity, and Equity in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the history of American public education beginning with Colonial America, and the evolution of education based on the political, economic, social, and cultural changes regarding a free and equal education for all children. It will focus on the development of public education and the conflicts over class, race, religion, and gender. The second part of the course will highlight the landmark 1954 US Supreme Court ruling in Brown v Board of Education. Students will study the effects of the ruling and the legacy the case holds in contemporary America. Throughout the course, the students will examine the changes in education due to social dynamics and conflicts in terms of the struggle for access, opportunity, and equity.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course.

Spring 2018HIS ST302AE3116MW6:30pm - 7:45pm(G. Donoyan)

HIS ST303. Special Topics in History Doing Public History. 3 Credit Hours.

The course introduces students to the historical origins of public history as an academic discipline. It explores the relationship of public history to local communities, the creation of cultural memory, and the study of history within the academy. These themes will be approached through the prism of institutions such as museums, historical societies, corporations, preservation offices and other cultural resource agencies. Other topics will include educational programming, material culture and exhibit development as well as how to make local historical materials available within historical societies, museums, and manuscript repositories. Each student will work on a public history project at a local Public History institution, contributing a minimum of 25 hours of work.
Prerequisites: HIS 261 or HIS 262 or HIS 282 or LCS 282 and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017HIS ST303A1123MWF11:00am - 11:50am(G. Mohanty)