2017-2018

Political Science (POLS)

Courses

POLS 241. Introduction to Global Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the field of global politics, also known as international relations. It focuses on a variety of interconnected topics, including the development of the nation-state system and political interactions among countries over issues of war and peace, human rights, and economic and environmental policies. We also explore the evolution and work of international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank, and non-governmental international organizations such as environmental and human rights groups. This course is cross-listed with GLOB 241.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 241A1087TTh12:30pm - 1:45pmTBD
Fall 2017POLS 241B1091MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(J. Hamill)
Fall 2017POLS 241C1093TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Clarke)
Fall 2017POLS 241D1095MWF9:00am - 9:50am(J. Hamill)
Fall 2017POLS 241E1097MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(J. Hamill)
Spring 2018POLS 241A3087MWF9:00am - 9:50amTBD
Spring 2018POLS 241B3089MWF1:00pm - 1:50pmTBD
Spring 2018POLS 241C3091TTh9:30am - 10:45am(E. Copeland)
Spring 2018POLS 241D3093TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(N. Freiner)
Spring 2018POLS 241E3085MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 256. Government and Society in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an introductory course about the role of U.S. government in American society. After tracing the development of the U.S. Constitution, the course surveys a range of topics including Congress, the presidency, the Supreme Court, federalism, political parties and elections, interest groups, civil liberties, and civil rights. Contemporary domestic policy debates are also covered.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 256A1144TTh9:30am - 10:45am(M. Clarke)
Fall 2017POLS 256B1146MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(R. Holtzman)
Fall 2017POLS 256C1147MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(R. Holtzman)
Spring 2018POLS 256A3136TTh8:00am - 9:15amTBD
Spring 2018POLS 256B3137TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Clarke)
Spring 2018POLS 256C3138MWF12:00pm - 12:50pmTBD
Spring 2018POLS 256D3139MWF1:00pm - 1:50pmTBD

POLS 290. Honors Politics of the Global System. 3 Credit Hours.

This honors course explores the current global political system.It examines major historical developments that shaped the actors and power distribution of the current system. Next, it explores competing international relations theories that attempt to explain the main motivations and realities guiding the behavior of actors in the system. Then, it focuses on contemporary issues with global implications. Subsequently, it examines recent and future challenges faced by particular key actors in the system as they attempt to shape the global system of the future. It concludes by returning to the system level to consider the prospects for global cultural clashes or peace through globalization. Students receiving credit for POLS 241/GLOB 241, Introduction to Global Politics, cannot receive credit for this class. This course is cross-listed with GLOB 290.
Prerequisites: Honors Program
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 290HN1089MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 291. Honors Contemporary American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This honors course covers the ideas and historical factors that shaped the formation and evolution of the U.S. political system. It examines the main governmental and non-governmental players in the contemporary policy-making system and how they interact to create policy decisions. It explores some key ongoing policy debates. Additionally, it goes beyond book knowledge to examine contemporary, practical politics throughout the semester. Students receiving credit for POLS 256, Government and Society in America, cannot receive credit for this class.
Prerequisites: Honors program
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 351. United States Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course survey the instruments, implementation and issues of U.S. foreign policy. Students will learn about America's rise to power and its current role in the world with a focus both on how foreign policy is made and Post WWII U.S. involvements overseas.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2018POLS 351A3140MWF11:00am - 11:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 352. The Politics of Government and Business in America. 3 Credit Hours.

What is the nature of the relationships that exist between government and business, politics and economy, power and money in the United States? And why do these relationships matter? In this course, we will use these questions as a starting-point from which to undertake a critical examination of these relationships as they exist today and to consider where they might be heading in the future, and to generate conclusions about their potential implications - political, economic, and social.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 352A1148MWF10:00am - 10:50am(R. Holtzman)

POLS 353. Political Parties and Elections. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the history of party politics, party organization, nominations and elections, voting, and the role of pressure groups, public opinion, and the media in the national electoral process. The course is offered in the fall semester of even numbered years when congressional and/or presidential elections take place.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 361. Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the key concepts, issues, and trends in comparative politics. Comparative politics focuses on the study of political organization and behavior using the method of comparison across time and between country cases. The course covers topics such as various types of political systems, political participation, economic development, and nationalist movements/identities. Types of countries covered include: established democracies, authoritarian regimes, communist, and developing countries.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 361A1149TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(E. Copeland)
Spring 2018POLS 361A3141TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(E. Copeland)

POLS 363. Latin American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Students explore the social and political foundations of Latin American societies, and their contemporary political institutions and practices. This course focuses on the varying roles played by political culture, the main political actors, foreign intervention, and developmental issues in Latin American politics.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

POLS 364. European Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the political, economic, and social systems of countries in Europe. It also analyses the process of integration that has created the European Union. Some of the themes examined include varying political systems, political participation, social movements, political parties, and government social policies, as well as issues raised by sharing power between individual countries and the EU. Countries examined will include some from Western, Central and Eastern Europe.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 365. The Middle East in War and Peace. 3 Credit Hours.

After tracing the rise of Arabism and Islam, this course examines how the modern Middle East was shaped by the influence of European colonialism. It then examines recent regional conflicts and their resolution, including: the Arab/Israeli wars, the Palestinian uprising, the Iran-Iraq war, and the Gulf war.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 365CE1150T6:30pm - 9:10pm(G. Fetzer)

POLS 366. Politics of Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course uses comparative methodology to analyze the government and domestic politics of India, China, and Japan. Students will be introduced to the political institutions and processes of the three countries, and explore the impact of history, cultural dynamics specific to Asia and South Asia, government structures and economic change on political processes. State-society relations are examined within the context of democratization, development, and citizen movements. Issues regarding cultural and scholarly lenses will be addressed through critical examination of relevant materials and theories discussed in class.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290, or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018POLS 366A3142TTh9:30am - 10:45am(N. Freiner)

POLS 367. Global Environmental Sustainability and Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the intersection of global environmental sustainability issues, political policy, and the world economic issues. It focuses on different trajectories of environmental and ecological politics and thought, and on foundations for policy, with particular focus on climate change. The central premise is that deciding how to respond to climate change is a highly political process involving conflicts over competing values and interests, the growth of international institutions, and the link between climate change and the global economy.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 391. Political Science Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply political science theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with supervising a faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantive report on their internship experience and the studies involved.
Prerequisites: POLS 256 or POLS 291 or GLOB 241/POLS 241 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 and junior standing or approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair.

POLS 456. The Presidency in Modern American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

The image of the presidency today as the centerpiece of the American political system is very different than the one originally outlined in the U.S. Constitution. What has brought about this change? How has this transformation impacted the separation of powers and the respective roles of Congress and the Supreme Court? What does the popular image of the president as "chief decider" signify for a democratic system of government? These questions and more guide this course's exploration of the presidency in modern American politics. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018POLS 456A3143MWF10:00am - 10:50amTBD

POLS 462. International Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students analyze the nature of the modern nation/state system, and the resultant struggle for power, including power politics, balance of power, and war and peace. This course covers the bases and limitations of national power as well as international law, international organization and diplomacy. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 463. Ethics in International Affairs. 3 Credit Hours.

"All's fair in love and war" used to effectively summarize global politics, but in recent years, moral considerations have become major, but still controversial, components of many policy discussions. This course will examine issues such as the ethical constraints on the use of force, human rights norms, issues created by global inequality and by development programs, and ethical implications of the global economy and multinational corporations. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 463A1152MWF11:00am - 11:50am(J. Dietrich)

POLS 464. Political Ideologies - Old and New. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines first the conflicting political philosophies of liberalism, conservatism, and Marxism which shaped the development of Western democracies and the former Communist countries, and then considers modern ideological debates over third world nationalism, environmentalism, and feminism.
Prerequisites: GLOB/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2018POLS 464A3144TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(N. Freiner)

POLS 471. Russian and East European Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers an integrated look at East European and Russian politics primarily for juniors and seniors. We look at Bulgaria, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and the former "East Germany" (ex-GDR), Hungary and Poland. We also consider the Balkans including ex-Yugoslav successor states. Finally, we examine Russian domestic and foreign policy concentrating on the post-Soviet period.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

POLS 481. Politics of Developing Countries. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the political, economic, and social structures of the broad array of countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East that make up the developing world. The major challenges faced by these countries and strategies adopted to address them will be identified and analyzed. A historical overview of the evolution of the developing world will explore the impact of colonialism and issues of post-colonialism. Issues of gender, race, ethnicity, sustainable development and the environment will also be explored.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

POLS 483. Politics of International Economic Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the role of individual country governments, official international economic organizations, and globally-oriented non-governmental organizations (NGO's) in the international economic system. It examines conflict and cooperation among nations, as well as interactions between countries and international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization, as they engage in the management of trade, investment flows, exchange rates, debt, and the global environment. It also considers politics within individual countries as they affect that country's international economic policies, looking at governmental relations with business, labor associations and other non-governmental organizations as these impact on trade policies, exchange rates, and the regulation of multinational corporations' overseas operations.
Prerequisites: GLOB 241/POLS 241 or POLS 256 or GLOB 290/POLS 290 or POLS 291
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2017POLS 483A1151TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(E. Copeland)

POLS 490. Seminar in Politics and Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar is designed as an interdisciplinary capstone course for students in the Politics and Law major. It will include an in-depth examination of a selected theme in politics and law. Each student will work intensively with the instructor to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice, which will be presented to the entire seminar. This course is cross-listed with LGLS 490.
Prerequisites: Politics and Law major and senior standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2017POLS 490A1101T3:30pm - 6:15pm(A. Boggio)

POLS 497. Directed Study in Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the political science faculty. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project.
Prerequisites: varies by topic.