Communication (COM) 2022-2023 Edition

Courses

COM 202. Public Speaking. 3 Credit Hours.

This “soft skills” course is designed to help students learn how to communicate in public and digital contexts. By the completion of the course, students should be able to: research, outline, and organize public messages including those that are informative, persuasive, and entertaining; analyze an audience; understand how verbal and nonverbal components of delivery influence speaker credibility; develop strategies to reduce and manage fears about communicating in public contexts; create and use visual aids appropriate to the message; respond to questions effectively and substantively; utilize critical and creative thinking skills. Because speakers and audiences live and interact in a multicultural society, this course will also consider the composition of the audience in crafting ethical, empathetic speeches which consider both the speaker and audience as members of various co-cultures.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 202A1140TTh3:30pm - 4:45pmTBD
Fall 2022COM 202C1359MWF12:00pm - 12:50pmTBD
Fall 2022COM 202CE1142T6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD
Summer 2022COM 202A4107MTWThF9:00am - 10:30am(T. Zammarelli)
Winter Session 2023COM 202A2001MTWThF8:30am - 11:30am(T. Zammarelli)
Spring 2023COM 202A3299TTh9:30am - 10:45am(M. Robins)
Spring 2023COM 202B3301TTh3:30pm - 4:45pmTBD
Spring 2023COM 202CE3302T6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD

COM 203. Introduction to Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to explore various topics related to communication. Students will learn how communication is defined and how research in the field is performed and evaluated. Furthermore, students will be introduced to various theories in communication as well as some of the common areas within the field (interpersonal, mass, health, intercultural, small group, etc.) Students taking this course can expect to apply the knowledge they gain to various aspects of their personal and professional lives, engage in critical thinking skills, and become familiar with the many options and career choices that study in communication can provide.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 203A1143MWF10:00am - 10:50am(S. Baran)
Fall 2022COM 203B1144TTh3:30pm - 4:45pm(M. Robins)
Fall 2022COM 203C1145MWF9:00am - 9:50am(S. Baran)
Fall 2022COM 203D1147MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(K. Pearce)
Fall 2022COM 203E1148TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(K. Berkos)
Fall 2022COM 203F1146TTh9:30am - 10:45am(M. Robins)
Spring 2023COM 203A3303TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(K. Berkos)
Spring 2023COM 203C3305MWF9:00am - 9:50am(S. Baran)
Spring 2023COM 203D3306MWF10:00am - 10:50am(S. Baran)
Spring 2023COM 203E3307TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Robins)

COM 204. Honors The Process of Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with an in-depth introduction to the fundamental philosophies underlying the field of communication. It is a sophisticated, seminar-structured class designed for students who have declared communication as a major or minor and for those considering pursuing a degree in communication. As an honors course, this class takes a deeper, more detailed look at communication as a process and at a number of important concepts (areas of study) in the discipline. Likewise, course expectations of student performance and output are high. Students who received credit for COM 203, Introduction to Communication cannot receive credit for COM 204.
Prerequisites: Honors Program
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 204HN1149MWF8:00am - 8:50am(S. Baran)
Spring 2023COM 204A3995MWF8:00am - 8:50am(S. Baran)

COM 205. Introduction to Digital Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

As an introduction course students will examine the evolution and evolving nature of digital communication. Through lecture and activities students will survey the technologies that have been adapted and reframed for industries, look at how digital culture has affected our human interactions and explore how we use mobile, web, streaming and browsing of audio and video in our everyday lives. Students focus on technologies as both the consumer and the creator and deciphering factors affecting both, including internet governance, ethics, free speech and privacy. The course will examine industries impacted by digital technologies and explore the current and future issues they face.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023COM 205A3996TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(T. Zammarelli)

COM 230. Introduction to Film Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course has three major aims: to introduce students to what might be called the language of film, to investigate the relationship between movies and culture, and to consider film as both an art form and a social practice. Students will examine the tools filmmakers employ to bring their works to the screen, including cinematography, production design, acting, editing, music, sound design, and narrative structure. Students will also focus on how the cinema both reflects and perpetuates aspects of culture, investigating images of masculinity, femininity, class, and race relations. By semester's end students should have a much clearer sense of what goes into the making of movies, and should have become more active, critical viewers of film. This course is cross-listed with LCS 230.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Summer 2022COM 230SE4108MW6:30pm - 9:10pm(T. Dooley)
Winter Session 2023COM 230B2002MTWThF1:00pm - 4:00pm(T. Dooley)

COM 242. Basic Studio Production. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to television production in which, through basic studio exercises and productions, students become familiar with the tools of the medium and the processes involved in the creation of completed video content. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role played by software and hardware in the structuring of visual, auditory, and motion elements to communicate through television.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 242FE1150W6:30pm - 9:10pm(T. Dooley)
Fall 2022COM 242JE1151Th2:00pm - 4:40pm(T. Dooley)
Spring 2023COM 242FE3308W6:30pm - 9:10pm(T. Dooley)
Spring 2023COM 242JE3309Th3:00pm - 5:40pm(T. Dooley)

COM 243. Digital Media Production. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers an introduction to single-camera video production and editing. In a series of short film assignments, covering a variety of formats/styles, you will learn how to shoot digital media content (outside of the studio environment) and edit your video using Adobe Premiere. This is a hands-on, workshop style course, in which students share and discuss their ideas, raw footage and “rough cut” edits as they go. Technical training will be gradual, with a gently sloped learning curve, so the focus remains where it should be – on expressing your creativity while learning to use shot composition, camera movement, and editing techniques to inform and entertain the viewer.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 243A1152TTh5:00pm - 6:15pm(T. Dooley)
Spring 2023COM 243A3997T3:00pm - 5:40pm(T. Dooley)

COM 251. Written Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course analyze and write various messages appropriate to a variety of communication settings and distribution platforms, traditional and digital. The course emphasizes the interpersonal and ethical aspects of modern writing style and structure, with special attention to professional or career writing.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

COM 252. Professional Writing as Storytelling. 3 Credit Hours.

Contemporary professional writing stresses telling stories that reinforce or expand the brand, that is, the organization’s identity. Stories are the way that humans make sense of the world. When we talk about our pets or our family members, we don’t simply describe them. We tell stories about them. This reality has changed the way communication is practiced at the corporate level. Today, effective writing consists of a strong narrative and a powerful storyline, both of which now trump style and flash. Organizations are not faceless entities sending information to people; rather they are now people connecting with people, especially in this age of sharing and social media. This class teaches the process of telling great stories in differing lengths and formats for diverse platforms. Students take their basic writing skills and, with peer and instructor evaluation, shape and refine those skills through storytelling writing that will have vast implications for a variety of professional careers.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

COM 260. Media Literacy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the necessary tools for examining mass media content from a critical perspective. Students will be able to discuss the literacies (print, digital, information, etc.), and the societal importance of both on personal and cultural levels. Students will "read" advertisements, observe TV programming genres such as "reality TV" and news, examine the impact of media on children, study the effects of production values on film content, and deal with assessing texts and narratives in other media such as the Internet, videogames, radio, magazines, and newspapers. Once students learn to read, interpret, critically examine, and productively use media, they will be able to apply those skills to various audiences.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

COM 265. Social Networks in Digital Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course connects theories and applications of communication to issues, opportunities, and strategies in social media and social media marketing. Students will focus on messages and the relevance and use of channels; the user experience and motivations behind big data; networks, co-creation, virtual communities, and participatory culture; and social media and its relation and influence on power, culture, gender, education, and economics.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 265FE1155W6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD
Spring 2023COM 265CE3312T6:30pm - 9:10pmTBD

COM 270. Interpersonal Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to be an introduction to interpersonal communication and examines concepts/contexts relevant to the study of communication in relationships e.g. language, perception, nonverbal signals, conflict, etc. The focus of the course will be on the various elements that impact relationships, as well as how these elements occur in the context of different types of social interactions. In addition, the course is designed to encourage students to increase their understanding of the research that is guided by these elements and the application that has to real-world experiences.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 270A1156TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(K. Berkos)
Spring 2023COM 270A3313TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(K. Berkos)

COM 272. Mass Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course familiarizes students with mass media industries by developing an understanding of industry structures, trends, economics, organization, and the impact of these on content, culture, and agency. Media industries examined include television/cable/streaming services, radio/music, advertising, public relations, Internet, print media, and video games. Media literacy is a major theme embedded throughout the course as students navigate social responsibility by examining media content from a critical perspective. Finally, students will acquaint themselves with industry-related concepts including, but not limited to concentration of ownership, conglomeration, media literacy, synergy, mass communication theories, digitization, convergence, fragmentation, deregulation, media effects, hyper commercialism, deregulation, mass communication theory, globalization, agenda setting, First Amendment issues, censorship, cultivation, and media ethics.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 272A1158MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(S. Baran)
Spring 2023COM 272A3315MWF11:00am - 11:50am(K. Pearce)

COM 275. How Language Works. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course you will explore the intuitive knowledge that a native speaker of a language possesses and acquire greater insight into the intricacies of human language. Topics include units of meaning, sentence structure, speech production, language in context, language in society, native and non-native language development, shades of meaning, conversational norms, language change over time, artificial language, and writing systems. This course is cross-listed with ML 275.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 275A1680MF2:00pm - 3:15pm(C. Oliva)

COM 280. Introduction to Health Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with an introduction to the area of health communication, an area that is large and multifaceted. Students taking this course will learn about a variety of topics that provide the foundation for work in health and health communication. Topics include (but are not limited to): patient-provider interactions, social support, health literacy, health campaigns and promotion, the influence of technology on health, and the role of culture in health.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

Spring 2023COM 280A3998TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(J. Volkman)

COM 332. Writing and Reporting for Broadcast and Digital Media. 3 Credit Hours.

This course gives students hands-on learning and experience creating broadcast and digital news content. Course assignments are filmed in the television studio, but with an emphasis on the “nontechnical” aspects of electronic journalism. Specifically, students learn the communication skills that producers and reporters use when researching and writing news stories, conducting interviews, and delivering news live on the air or via the Internet. This course is also recommended for those with an interest in public relations, or for those who simply want to sharpen their writing and presentation skills.
Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 332A1161TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(M. Montecalvo)
Spring 2023COM 332A3317TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(M. Montecalvo)

COM 343. Narrative Filmmaking. 3 Credit Hours.

Information that is embedded in a narrative (story) is more easily understood and remembered, and increases our interest by generating curiosity and anticipation. Narrative also elicits an emotional response that can motivate us to think, feel, or act differently. Thus, storytelling is a powerful tool for more effective communication in any professional environment. This hands-on course teaches fundamental skills that filmmakers use to tell fictional narratives (stories) in filmed media. Students learn what narrative is, how to create it, and how to shape it using camera and editing techniques. Other topics include how to direct actors, maintain continuity, and use the soundtrack more creatively. Students shoot and edit their own short films, which are then screened in class.
Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2022COM 343A1855T2:00pm - 4:40pm(T. Dooley)

COM 344. Sports Media Production. 3 Credit Hours.

Covering a live sporting event is one of the most dynamic forms of video-mediated communication. The pace is fast, the narrative largely unscripted, and creative and editorial decisions must be made rapidly. This course uses sports broadcasting as a platform for confronting the challenges of live, remote production. Classroom instruction is reinforced by hands-on experience, as students work in production groups to create network-style, multi-camera broadcasts of Bryant athletic events. Rotating through various roles and responsibilities, students develop skills in multi-camera directing, field production, video editing, writing, reporting, announcing, and special effects. Also, students learn how to identify, shape and present the narrative (story) elements of public events as they unfold. (Note: Students must be available for the broadcast of three Saturday afternoon games during the semester).
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2022COM 344A1162M3:00pm - 5:40pm(W. Franco)
Spring 2023COM 344A3318M3:00pm - 5:40pm(W. Franco)

COM 345. Documentary Filmmaking. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students learn how to create films using nonfictional "real" content as source material. The course covers all the creative aspects of documentary production: choosing a topic, creating a quasi-narrative framework, directing, writing and editing. Lectures, screenings and film assignments also explore how the filmmaker's communicative goal and point of view are expressed in a variety of modern documentary styles. And on the most practical level, students learn how to meet the challenge of scheduling a production based on "real" events that are often beyond the filmmaker's control. This course is also recommended for those who have an interest in journalism (both TV and print) or public relations for the non-profit sector.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

COM 346. Talk Radio: Sports, Politics and Podcasting. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the skills needed to become a talk radio or podcast host. Special attention is given to the main functions of talk radio or podcast host as a researcher, interviewer, and storyteller. This course focuses on developing and planning live or taped talk show and podcast segments including researching topics, setting up interviews, writing interview questions, interviewing guests, and interacting with guests and other hosts. This course will also focus on integrating developing technologies in the broadcast field utilized by the talk radio and podcast hosts.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 346A1163TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Montecalvo)
Spring 2023COM 346A3999TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Montecalvo)

COM 352. Writing for Social Media. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the relationship between audience, purpose, image, and text and assess the trends in writing for the major social media platforms. Students will focus on creating and curating content and increasing their level of engagement on social media through effective, active social media writing assignments across a variety of personal and professional platforms.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023COM 352A3320TTh3:30pm - 4:45pm(M. Robins)

COM 353. Writing for Digital Media. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of how digital writing addresses multiple genres, tools, platforms, and audiences. Students will effectively create digital content, analyze, and compose digital texts, and learn the multimodal writing processes of digital communication for audiences across a variety of digital mediums.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 353A1164TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(M. Robins)

COM 357. Digital Storytelling. 3 Credit Hours.

Digital storytelling has changed the way media is gathered and delivered to an audience across a broad range of industries. You may be asked to explain a concept, make an argument or profile an individual or event as a digital storyteller. This course focuses on the skills needed to become an effective digital storyteller no matter what your major or chosen career field. You will learn to plan and develop live and recorded content for a variety of purposes and platforms. Special attention is given to the four main functions of a digital storyteller including: producing, writing, capturing and editing.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate.

Fall 2022COM 357A1856TTh9:30am - 10:45am(T. Zammarelli)

COM 359. The Sociological Imagination: What We See When We Watch T.V.. 3 Credit Hours.

This course uses the Sociological Imagination as the lens through which to analyze of the content of television. We will apply "The sociological imagination" (C. Wright Mills famous concept) to episodes of "The Wire", an HBO series that ran for five years. We will examine the lives of the characters and "urban space" as chronicled in "The Wire" including the work, neighborhoods, the city, morality, sexuality, politics, "childhood," gender and gender expression, race and social justice. We will also consider the relationship between social structures, culture, structure and agency. This course is cross-listed with SOC 359.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 359A1430TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(J. McDonnell)

COM 360. Crisis and Risk Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

The need to assess, understand and implement an effective communication strategy following a crisis or risk event is becoming increasingly important. Whether dealing with the fallout from an environmental disaster, warning the public about a health hazard, interacting with the public on issues of terrorism, dealing with fallout from a public scandal, or addressing an organizational crisis, the need for effective communication management and its successful implementation is high. This course will focus on examining the intricate parts to the crisis/risk communication process, risk/crisis plans and public implementation.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate.

Spring 2023COM 360A3322MWF2:00pm - 2:50pm(C. Morse)

COM 361. Public Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this course consider the public relations process with emphasis on how corporations and other institutions relate to their various publics. Readings and discussions center on methods of conducting effective public relations and on legal and ethical issues. Students plan programs and copy for various media.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 361JE1165M6:30pm - 9:10pm(D. Nolfe)
Spring 2023COM 361FE3323W6:30pm - 9:10pm(D. Nolfe)

COM 363. Communication and Conflict Management in Intimate Relationships. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of conflict and the role that communication plays in causing, escalating, and/or managing the conflict process. After exploring basic elements of the conflict process (e.g. attributions, goals, power, tactics, etc.), the class will examine ways of altering negative conflict cycles, and the nature and effects of conflict in various intimate relationships such as parent-child relationship, same- and cross-sex friendship, and dating and marital relationships. This course is appropriate for anyone wishing to gain a better understanding of the complexities of interpersonal conflict as well as better and worse ways of managing the process.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

COM 366. Intercultural Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

Intercultural communication is the systematic study of communicative interaction between individuals and groups whose cultural understandings, presuppositions and value orientations are distinct enough to exhibit clear effects on the course and consequences of communicative events. Students will be introduced to key concepts and issues in intercultural communication; and through the analysis of case studies of intercultural encounters within different settings in the U.S. and abroad, students will learn to understand the ways in which subtle connections between "culture" and "communication" are implicated in a broad range of interpersonal difficulties from "culture shock" to open conflict.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2022COM 366A1166MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(K. Pearce)

COM 367. Small Group Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to (a) give students a better understanding of the communicative practices that make a small group successful, and (b) provide students with the tools to diagnose and rectify potential obstacles to good group work. Students will accomplish these objectives by surveying theory and research in key areas of small group communication including cohesiveness, conflict, power, conformity and deviance, social influence, group roles and processes, group structures, leadership, and decision-making skills. In addition, students will have the opportunity to apply such theory and research by interacting in a small group environment to solve a problem, and then analyzing what their group did right and what their group did wrong.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

Fall 2022COM 367A1167TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(M. Robins)
Spring 2023COM 367A3324MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(K. Pearce)

COM 368. Organizational Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to contemporary theory and intellectual traditions applied to the study of organizational communication, including the role of organizations in society and cultural practices. Whatever your career goals, the knowledge you gain from participating in this course will help you make sense of how communication is integral to the organizational experience. The focus will be on all forms of communication within the organization including small group, interpersonal, intercultural, and public. Other topics include superior-subordinate communication, communication and leadership, and the role of communication in developing organizational identity.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 368A1857TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(T. Zammarelli)

COM 370. Media Organizations. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to major issues involved in the management, production, and distribution of the mass media. Topics include the technical side of media production, the history and development of media organizations, business aspects of broadcasting and cable, media regulation, societal effects and the impact of new technology on traditional broadcast media. The focus will be on the history and development of media organizations and how they have helped shape American culture. Students will also discuss the impact of new technology such as HDTV and internet television. This class will examine how the media are both products of social forces as well as social forces in their own right.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023COM 370A3325TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(T. Zammarelli)

COM 380. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth study of nonverbal communication, such as body language, eye contact, touch, vocalics, etc. It does so in two ways. The first will be to examine various theories and research about the codes and communicative functions of nonverbal behaviors. This will provide an understanding of the importance, persuasiveness, and effect of nonverbal communication, and the role it plays in the overall communication process. The second way that the course will examine nonverbal communication is to experience actively how people use it, and discover what happens when nonverbal rules are violated. This course will provide students with a subjective awareness of their own and others nonverbal messages.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023COM 380A4000TTh9:30am - 10:45am(K. Berkos)

COM 390. Research Methods in Communication/Digital Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students in Communication and Digital Communication to research methods and concepts used in the field. During the semester, students will learn about ethical implications, sampling, variables, hypothesis testing and research design. They will also explore several different research techniques (e.g., surveys, experiments, content analysis, social network analysis, etc.). In addition, students will also be introduced to some basic statistical techniques used in the analysis of research data. The goal is to not only provide students with the groundwork for understanding and conducting research in these fields, but to also be able to be critical consumers of the research they will encounter in their future careers.
Prerequisites: COM 203 or COM 204 and MATH 201
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 390A1168MWF9:00am - 9:50am(C. Morse)
Spring 2023COM 390A3328MWF10:00am - 10:50am(K. Pearce)

COM 391. Communication Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Students engage in individually supervised work in communication and learn to apply communication skills, concepts, and theory to the work environment. Interns work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, do research related to the employment field, and prepare a report on the work experience and studies involved.
Prerequisites: Approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair and junior/senior standing.

COM 442. Advanced Digital Media. 3 Credit Hours.

With the advent of digital platforms including web sites, streaming networks, and social media platforms, it is no longer sufficient to think solely in the context of traditional broadcast and streaming media. Platforms such as Youtube, Roku and Tik Tok have changed all manner of content creation. This course will give you an understanding of how all areas of digital media production, both behind the scenes and in front of the camera, come together and are practiced at various stages, from preproduction through distribution, to create programming for both traditional and digital platforms. You will create high-end content in a simulated, professional environment taking on the roles of production personnel, from showrunner to craft service, with the ultimate goal of seeing your programming “air” on the chosen distribution platform for the semester.
Prerequisites: COM 242 or COM 243 or COM 332 or COM 344 or COM 345 and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023COM 442A4001T6:30pm - 9:10pm(T. Zammarelli)

COM 443. Script to Screen. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, students learn how content is shaped and reshaped (in a sense, rewritten) during each stage of production by developing an idea for a short video program and nurturing that concept through the production process from beginning to end. Students will write original scripts in a variety of formats, direct and edit their classmates' scripts, and devise ad copy to "sell" the completed projects to a target audience. Recommended for those who have an interest in media writing, producing, directing, editing, or marketing.
Prerequisites: COM 242 or COM 243 and junior standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023COM 443A3329TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(T. Dooley)

COM 444. The Newsroom. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to cover the broad spectrum of the actions required to make a live broadcast happen. The class will split into two teams responsible for a live weekly broadcast. We’ll examine exactly how everyone from the Producer to the Reporter to the Technical Crew directly impact the success or failure of a live broadcast. We’ll look at key job elements of those responsible for controlling the components that must come together for a successful broadcast. There are no second takes--there is only the controlled chaos and dynamic energy flowing as everyone does his or her job to make live television happen.
Prerequisites: COM 242 or COM 243
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023COM 444A3330TTh9:30am - 10:45am(T. Zammarelli)

COM 450. Film Genre Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

A genre approach to film study (one which takes the way we might categorize a film as its point of departure) provides the most effective means for understanding, analyzing, and appreciating cinema because it sees moviemaking as a dynamic process of exchange between the film industry and its audience. This allows us to think about a movie not just as an aesthetic object, but also as a consumer item molded in part by the shifting demands of the mass market. A particular film, then, can tell us as much about the audience for which it's intended and the moment in history to which it belongs as it can about the institutions that produced it. This course examines the way this "dynamic process of exchange" works by looking critically at examples of genre filmmaking of the last several decades. This course is cross-listed with LCS 450.
Prerequisites: COM 230/LCS 230 and junior standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

Fall 2022COM 450CE1169T6:30pm - 9:10pm(T. Zammarelli)

COM 452. Personal Branding in Digital Media. 3 Credit Hours.

In digital communication, tools and methods are available for people to share ideas, thoughts, and content online, providing key opportunities for product and personal marketing to support a brand image. This course is a practical, hands-on class where students explore the history and concept of branding and how it applies to aspects of self-presentation and self-promotion in digital media. Students will focus on developing and strengthening their own brand with an emphasis on the use of creating content for use on digital platforms.
Prerequisites: COM 252
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023COM 452A4002TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(M. Robins)

COM 460. Advanced Media Literacy. 3 Credit Hours.

In exploring media literacy, this course provides students with the necessary tools for examining mass media content from a critical perspective with consideration for several related literacies, including by not limited to information, digital, print, and technological literacy. This is a research class, which allows student to engage media topics of particular interest to them and engage in experiential learning by conducting media literacy workshops in K-12 schools. Some of the general topics to be explored include determining methods for incorporating media literacy skills into youth culture, exploring measurements for determining quality media content, examining paradigm shifts in media education over the past many decades, and parental media education.
Prerequisites: COM 260 or COM 272
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

COM 461. Event Planning. 3 Credit Hours.

This course emphasizes planning, researching, executing, and evaluating actual public relations campaigns. Students will work with various community based and non-profit clients and will conduct actual semester long event planning campaigns. At least one special event will be completed with each client. Public relations problem solving skills, as well as the fundamentals in news writing, public speaking, and media skills will be emphasized in this course.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023COM 461A3331TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(S. Guay)

COM 463. Innovative Communication Applications. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an advanced level course with a revolving topic of timely relevance to the field of communication. While the topic may vary, the focus is a combination of theory-based reserch as well as real-world application that students can use in any field they choose to enter. Previous topics have included political communication, social media, and communication for social change.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

COM 470. Persuasion and Social Influence. 3 Credit Hours.

Communicative efforts to influence us and our efforts to influence others are so common that we rarely give them a second thought--that is, until they do not work the way we intended. This course is designed to introduce you to theoretical and applied issues in the study of social influence. It presents a broad overview of the area with an emphasis on the creation and consumption of persuasive messages in a variety of contexts including advertising, politics, health, and even our own interpersonal relationships.
Prerequisites: COM 203 or COM 204
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Fall 2022COM 470A1171MWF11:00am - 11:50am(C. Morse)
Spring 2023COM 470A3332TTh9:30am - 10:45am(J. Volkman)

COM 471. Advanced Interpersonal. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth look at a specific type of interpersonal relationship or interpersonal communication context. The specific topics for the course will rotate based on student and instructor interest. Students will extend what they have learned in COM 270 and apply interpersonal communication theories and research to specific situations. Examples of course topics include: marital and family communication, lifespan communication, and the impact of mood and emotion on communication.
Prerequisites: COM 203 or COM 204 or COM 270
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

COM 472. Media Effects. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the impact of mass media on individuals and contemporary culture. Areas of examination include media cultivation, desensitization, priming, violence, agenda-setting, media framing, hypersexualization, gender portrayals, commercialism content, persuasion, the empathetic audience, entertainment education, media discourse, numerous media theories, and digital communication, to name a few. Students in this course will complete semester-long research on a media effects topic of their choosing and will deliver presentations on a number of mass communication theories.
Prerequisites: COM 203 or COM 204
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 472A1172MWF10:00am - 10:50am(K. Pearce)
Spring 2023COM 472A3333M3:30pm - 6:10pm(S. Baran)

COM 473. Gender and Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This class is designed to explore the complex relationships among women, men, language, and communication from theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will be exposed to relevant gender and communication-related social and political issues, research findings, and theory in a wide variety of contexts. Some of the many specific questions to be addressed include (but are not limited to): What is gender? How do we become gendered? How do we display and perpetuate gender through our use of language and nonverbal codes? What are the effects of media on our experiences of gender? How do the popular media portray gender and sexuality? Additionally, we will explore differences and similarities in how men and women communicate and contrast research findings in these areas with those views espoused in popular literature.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

COM 474. The Dark Side of Human Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will investigate how individuals cope with social interaction that is difficult, problematic, challenging, distressing and disruptive. Specific topics to be covered may include jealousy, deception, infidelity, gossip, unrequited love, sexual coercion, stalking, breakups, and codependent relationships. In this seminar style course, students will study relevant research and theory and apply this research to real or hypothetical situations.
Prerequisites: COM 203 or COM 204 or COM 270
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

COM 478. Global Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on cross-national comparative approaches to the study of communication policy and practice. It illustrates the value of comparative study through discussions of broadcasting, cable, telecommunications, culture and new media policies and practices such as those surrounding the Internet. This course focuses on the history, development, implementation and effects of global communication systems. There is an emphasis on how culture is a shaping force in the development of communication policy and practices in each country.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 478A1174TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(T. Zammarelli)

COM 480. Advanced Health Communication Health Campaigns. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with an in-depth look into the area of health communication and the specific context of health message design, health promotion, and health behavior change. Building upon knowledge gained in Introduction to Health Communication, students will be presented with various theories and models that are used in the field as well as strategies and campaigns that are currently being enacted in society. Students will gain practice in applying knowledge gained in this course as they select, research, and design a health campaign of their own.
Prerequisites: COM 272 or COM 280 and junior standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023COM 480A3335TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(J. Volkman)

COM 491. Senior Seminar in Communication Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the major theories used in the study of human communication and the primary theoretical perspectives assumed by contemporary communication researchers. Because there is no single, grand theory of communication, the explanation of communication behavior has been undertaken by a number of other disciplines including anthropology, literary and cultural studies, cognitive and social psychology, sociology, and linguistics. Students will examine the contributions of each of these disciplines. An important focus of the class is on examining some of the epistemological assumptions upon which various theoretical positions are based. With a foundation in these assumptions, students should be able to grasp some unity in the midst of diversity.
Prerequisites: COM 203 or COM 204, senior standing, and Communication major
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022COM 491A1175TTh9:30am - 10:45am(K. Berkos)
Spring 2023COM 491A3336MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(C. Morse)

COM 497. Directed Study in Communication. 3 Credit Hours.

This course permits the student to pursue a communication area of interest and relevancy. The work will be performed under the supervision of a faculty member who will help design the program of study and the requirements to be met by the student.
Prerequisites: This course requires departmental permission on the basis of the agreed - upon plan of study.