History (HIS) 2022-2023 Edition

Courses

HIS 250. Emergence of Europe (1000-1600). 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and early development of Europe from 1000-1600. Topics include the overall character and decline of feudalism, the rise of national monarchies, urbanism and society during the Renaissance and Reformation. Socioeconomic and cultural history is emphasized.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 250A1442TTh8:00am - 9:15am(J. Pearson)
Spring 2023HIS 250A3474TTh9:30am - 10:45amTBD
Spring 2023HIS 250B3475TTh8:00am - 9:15am(J. Pearson)

HIS 252. Europe: 1500 to 1815. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a study of the political, intellectual, and social history of early modern Europe from 1500 to 1815, with emphasis on the institution of monarchy and on the reigns of famous kings and queens. Attention will also be given to the major transformations of the age including the scientific, English, and French Revolutions and their effects.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 252A1443TTh9:30am - 10:45am(R. Bobroff)
Fall 2022HIS 252B1444TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(R. Bobroff)
Spring 2023HIS 252A3476TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(R. Bobroff)
Spring 2023HIS 252B3477TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(R. Bobroff)

HIS 261. History of the United States to 1877. 3 Credit Hours.

A basic survey and introduction to the field of American history, this course conveys the political, cultural and economic development of the United States through Reconstruction. It provides an understanding of the foundation of the "American way of life".
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 261A1445TTh11:00am - 12:15pmTBD
Fall 2022HIS 261B1446TTh12:30pm - 1:45pmTBD
Spring 2023HIS 261A3478MWF10:00am - 10:50amTBD
Spring 2023HIS 261B3725MWF12:00pm - 12:50pmTBD

HIS 262. History of the United States Since 1865. 3 Credit Hours.

A history of the American experience from the end of Reconstruction to the present, this course focuses on the Urban-Industrial age, the rise of the United States to world leadership, and the important changes that have occurred in the "American way of life" during the past century.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 262A1447MWF10:00am - 10:50am(G. Mohanty)
Fall 2022HIS 262B1448MWF11:00am - 11:50am(K. Daly)
Fall 2022HIS 262C1449MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(K. Daly)
Fall 2022HIS 262D1450MF2:00pm - 3:15pmTBD
Fall 2022HIS 262E1451TTh12:30pm - 1:45pmTBD
Spring 2023HIS 262A3479MWF11:00am - 11:50amTBD
Spring 2023HIS 262B3480MF2:00pm - 3:15pm(B. Knapp)
Spring 2023HIS 262C3481TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(K. Daly)

HIS 263. American Women's History. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students survey American women's history from colonial times to the present. The course shows how the major social, political, and economic developments in American history have affected women in the past. Students examine the lives of "ordinary" women, as well as those of leading women thinkers and activists.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 263A1452MWF9:00am - 9:50am(K. Daly)

HIS 270. World History to 1500. 3 Credit Hours.

This introductory survey course traces the development of humanity and society from the dawn of history to 1500, and provides insight into the wide spectrum of ideas, institutions, and life practices that different people and cultures around the world have created. Various representations of "civilizations" and "community" are considered.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 270A1453MWF9:00am - 9:50am(J. Pearson)
Fall 2022HIS 270B1454MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Pearson)

HIS 271. World History Since 1500. 3 Credit Hours.

An historical study of the major regions and cultures of the world during the last five centuries, with attention to their connections and interactions and to the development of global trends. Political, economic social, intellectual, and cultural factors will be considered, and special emphasis will be placed on the emergence and the challenges of the people of the "third world". One theme will be an analysis of the processes of "modernization". This course is cross-listed with GLOB 271.
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023HIS 271A3528MWF9:00am - 9:50am(B. Knapp)

HIS 272. Introduction to Latin American History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a basic survey of Latin American history from before the European invasions to the recent past. The course emphasizes both the diversity of the Latin American experience across time and space and the persistence of certain historical continuities in the region: intense political and cultural conflict, deep social and economic inequality, and longstanding domination by externally-based imperial and neo-imperial powers.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 272A1455MWF1:00pm - 1:50pmTBD

HIS 273. History in the World Today. 3 Credit Hours.

The course requires students to formulate and support coherent arguments about complex historical problems in class discussions, essay exams, and writing projects. It strengthens students' global perspective by encouraging historical analysis of selected current world events and the U.S. relationship to/involvement in those events. By introducing students to historical methods and theory it enables them to understand more deeply one of the key disciplines associated with the humanities. This course is required for history majors and concentrators.
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 273B1457TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(B. Martin)
Spring 2023HIS 273A3483TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(B. Martin)

HIS 282. Introduction to American Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to key themes, concepts, and debates in American Studies. Students use a foundation in American Studies methodology to interpret a range of materials and develop a richer understanding of the United States, its cultures, and its peoples. Objects of study may include literary texts, films, historical documents, music, visual art, and products of popular culture. Specific course topics may vary. This course is cross-listed with LCS 282.
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 282A1363MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(B. Knapp)

HIS 303. French Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Biocultural theory posits the co-evolution of genes and culture. Language, culture, and imagination confer survival advantages to humans as a social species and have preserved evolved human complexity. This course takes biocultural approach to the works of French philosophers such as Montaigne, Descartes, Rousseau, Diderot, Voltaire, Saussure, Derrida, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Lacan. Students may take the course more than once, as different iterations. Topics of a given iteration may include humanism, skepticism, dualism, primitivism, language, textualism, indeterminacy, relativism, feminism, constructivism, historicism, and psychoanalysis. Materials and instruction are in English. This course is cross-listed with ML 303.
Prerequisites: 200-level History course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

HIS 304. Italian Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the history, society, politics, culture, and economics of modern Italy and its predecessors on the Italian Peninsula. Students may take the course more than once, as different iterations. Topics of a given iteration may include humanism, science, philosophy, the Inquisition, fascism, and the Vatican. Materials and instruction are in English. This course is cross-listed with ML 304.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Winter Session 2023HIS 304B2029MTWThF1:00pm - 4:00pm(J. Pearson)

HIS 351. History of Modern Europe: 1815 to the Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the major political, economic and intellectual developments since 1815. It emphasizes the significant events, patterns, and themes in Western history within the context of the modern world.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 351A1458MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(J. Pearson)
Spring 2023HIS 351A3485TTh9:30am - 10:45am(R. Bobroff)

HIS 354. Trends in Modern Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a selected history of modern and post-modern themes, ideologies and values in Euro-America (Western civilization) since the Renaissance. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing social, political and philosophical questions and writings in context. The thematic focus of the course (e.g., individualism) may change from year to year.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 354A1459MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(M. Bryant)

HIS 361. Gender and World War II. 3 Credit Hours.

Early in 1943, Max Lerner, the well-known author and journalist, writing for the New York newspaper, PM, predicted that "when the classic work on the history of women comes to be written, the biggest force for change in their lives will turn out to have been war." This course explores the question of whether or not World War II served as a major force for change in the lives women, both in the United States and around the globe. The experiences of a broad socio-economic and ethnic cross-section of wartime women are examined. In addition to the United States, areas of the world examined include women in China, France, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, Germany, and/or Italy.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 361A1460TTh9:30am - 10:45am(B. Knapp)

HIS 362. The United States in the 1960's. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the main contours of political, economic, social, and cultural life during the 1960's. Special areas of focus include: the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement, the resurgence of conservatism, the demise of the New Deal Coalition, the emerging women's liberation movement, the effect of social and cultural movements on business, and the intersection of artistic and cultural expressions with politics. The relationship of popular mythology and collective memories concerning the 1960's with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another key area of concern.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 362A1644TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(B. Martin)

HIS 364. History of American Technology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course treats the history of technology in the contexts of American business and social history. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, the course first places technological change within the context of larger developments in American history. From that basis, the course then moves on to deal with the impact of technology in American social institutions, business, and culture.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 364AE1461M6:30pm - 9:10pm(G. Mohanty)
Spring 2023HIS 364A3487MWF9:00am - 9:50am(G. Mohanty)

HIS 365. The United States and World Politics, 1890 to the Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and development of the United States as a great world power from the Spanish-American War to the post Cold War era. Focusing on the connections between international and domestic events, the course evaluates the role of the US as a global power over the past century.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 365A1462MWF9:00am - 9:50am(B. Knapp)
Fall 2022HIS 365B1831MWF10:00am - 10:50am(B. Knapp)
Spring 2023HIS 365A3488TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(B. Knapp)

HIS 366. Race in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines major issues in race relations from the perspective of both black and white Americans from the onset of slavery to the present. The course examines the origins and functioning of American slavery, with consideration to the Atlantic slave trade and the role of U.S. slavery within the context of New World slavery; the relationship between European immigrants and African-Americans in terms of the formation of whiteness and the historical meaning of white skin privilege ; abolitionism and antislavery; the development and functioning of Jim Crow segregation; 2nd Reconstruction; the civil rights movement; and the significance of race during the post civil rights era. This course is cross-listed with SOC 366, Race in America.
Prerequisites: SOC 251 and 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 366A1428TTh2:00pm - 3:15pmTBD

HIS 367. The History of American Popular Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the historical context of various expressions of American popular culture in a variety of media, including: literature, film, radio, television, music, performance, advertising, style and fashion, food, and the internet. It examines the meaning of popular culture to its audiences and the way those audiences use and transform cultural products as part of their everyday lives. Attention is given to popular culture's relationship to "high culture," to economics and commerce, and to social and political developments including, but not limited to the emergence of working-class culture, the Great Depression, the Cold War and McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and the Women's Liberation Movement.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Winter
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

Fall 2022HIS 367A1463TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(K. Daly)

HIS 368. Gender and American Culture in the 1950s. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students the opportunity to examine the cultural complexities of the 1950s and to appreciate it as a period of conservatism and restraint as well as a time of notable social change for women. It uses the enormously popular I Love Lucy television series (1951-1957) and Betty Friedan's classic work, The Feminine Mystique (1963), as well as related readings, to show how many women of the fifties challenged the stereotype of domestic, quiescent, suburban womanhood as they engaged in multifarious and diverse activities that helped pave the way for the social protest movements of the 1960s.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course and Sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 369. U.S. Latin American Relations 1820 to Present. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of relations between the United States and the nations of Latin America from the era of the Monroe Doctrine to the present.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023HIS 369A3489MWF12:00pm - 12:50pm(B. Knapp)
Spring 2023HIS 369B3969MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(B. Knapp)

HIS 371. History of Russia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an historical study of the evolution of Russian society from the Age of Kiev to the present including the era of the tsars and the Soviet period. Special attention is given to the contemporary situation in Russia.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

HIS 372. History of East Asia. 3 Credit Hours.

This course consists of an historical study of the ideas and institutions of the countries of East Asia with primary focus on developments in China in ancient times and in the modern era since 1800. Contemporary problems are also discussed.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023HIS 372A3490MWF10:00am - 10:50am(J. Pearson)
Spring 2023HIS 372B3828MWF11:00am - 11:50amTBD

HIS 373. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides background for an analysis of some of the major problems of contemporary African life. Topics include the ancient culture of Africa, the slave trade, colonialism, African nationalism, and current political, economic and social trends in Africa.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

Spring 2023HIS 373A3806MWF9:00am - 9:50amTBD

HIS 375. History of Modern Japan. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a survey and examination of Japanese history from its beginnings to the twentieth century, and includes a consideration of political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of Japanese traditions and values and their sources, and also on the history and practices of Japanese business. A major portion of the course will deal with the modern period and Japan's successes and failures as a modern nation.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

HIS 380. Doing Public History. 3 Credit Hours.

The course enables students to put their research and writing skills to work within the arena of museums, historical societies, and other cultural resource agencies while learning about public history’s origins. A twenty-hour internship at a local, on campus or digital public history institution, provides the opportunity to learn about what Public historians do. The class incorporates Bryant’s history, gathering information on the current campus and how the people who lived here before fit into Rhode Island history. Class assignments result in student proposals that incorporate their discoveries and research findings into exhibits, educational programming to draw larger communities onto our campus.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023HIS 380A3970TTh12:30pm - 1:45pm(G. Mohanty)

HIS 386. History, Law, and the Holocaust. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore in depth the Holocaust and its impact on the development of international law after 1945. Topics will include anti-Semitism, the rise of Hitler, the Final Solution, minority rights, domestic legal actions against perpetrators, the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, Allied military courts, and subsequent national and international trials of accused Nazi war criminals. The course concludes with an examination of some of the leading post-Nuremberg topics in international human rights law today, including peremptory norms, transitional justice, hate speech prohibitions, and Holocaust denial.
Prerequisites: 200 level history course and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023HIS 386A3470MWF10:00am - 10:50am(M. Bryant)
Spring 2023HIS 386B3472MWF11:00am - 11:50am(M. Bryant)

HIS 391. History Internship. 3 Credit Hours.

Students engage in individually supervised work-study arrangements and learn to apply history theory and principles in their work environment. Students must work at least ten hours per week on the job, meet periodically with a supervising faculty member, research literature related to the field of the internship, and prepare a substantial report on their internship experience and the studies involved. This course is limited to juniors and seniors and requires the approval of a supervising faculty member and the department chair.

HIS 410. Understanding Cuba History and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

Through selected literature and film, students will explore Cuban historical and cultural influences associated with the island nation, including Spanish colonialism, the independence movement, U.S. neocolonialism, the Cuban Revolution, Cuban society today including U.S. immigration. Readings will include works by both Cuban writers and non-Cuban writers, with all works read in Spanish by students seeking ML SP410 credit, or in English by students seeking History credit. These readings will serve as a base of information prior to an 8-day visit to Cuba over Spring Break. While in country, students will visit a number of museums, performances, and other locations in greater Havana that will bring these themes to life. Once back at Bryant, students will use their observations of daily life and culture to reflect upon all that they have learned through a collaborative research project and presentation. This course is cross-listed with ML SP410.
Prerequisites: 200 level history course and sophomore standing
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

HIS 435. World War I: Causes, Courses, and Consequences. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines one of the seminal events of the twentieth century - the First World War. The course will start by examining what factors led not just to a regional conflict but a global conflagration. These factors will include political, cultural, and military considerations. We will then examine the nature of the war experience, both at the front and at home. As the first Total War, World War I left few people untouched in the combatant countries, whether they wore a uniform or not. After an examination of why the war ended when it did and the peacemaking process, the course concludes with a study of the legacy of the war, stretching to the present time.
Prerequisites: one 200-level HIS course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Fall Semesters.

Fall 2022HIS 435A1890TTh11:00am - 12:15pm(R. Bobroff)

HIS 451. The World Since 1945. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines major developments in global history since 1945, considering topics such as the capitalist and socialist world-systems, the Cold War, imperialism, and third world independence movements, and the so-called "new world order." Special emphasis is placed on the interaction between Western and non-Western societies.
Prerequisites: 200 level history course
Session Cycle: Fall, Summer
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 451A1465MF2:00pm - 3:15pmTBD
Summer 2022HIS 451B4114MTWThF11:00am - 12:30pm(J. Pearson)

HIS 452. History of Modern Britain. 3 Credit Hours.

In this advanced course students trace the history of Great Britain from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the present, concentrating on cultural history and utilizing a socio-political perspective. Themes include the development of capitalism, constitutionalism, industrialism and imperialism, and the impact of the British expressions of these forces on modern globalization.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Fall 2022HIS 452A1832MWF11:00am - 11:50amTBD

HIS 453. History of Modern Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents a history of the modern natural sciences from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, treating the development of modern physics, chemistry, geology, and biology. Students need no special background in science. The course focuses on conceptual problems and the culture of science rather than on the content of science. Examples of special topics include the development of the Newtonian world-view, the challenges of relativity and the quantum, how alchemy led to modern chemistry, why so many early geologists were churchmen, and how Darwinian evolution differed from other nineteenth-century evolutionary theories. The course is geared to the capabilities of students without specialized background in history and science.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

Spring 2023HIS 453AE3491M6:30pm - 9:10pm(G. Mohanty)

HIS 461. History of Contemporary America. 3 Credit Hours.

An intensive examination of the forces and events that have shaped the recent American past, this course stresses domestic politics, social change, urbanization, civil rights and modern ecological problems.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 463. The United States in the 1970s and 1980s. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the major political, social, cultural, and economic shifts in American life during the 1970s and the 1980s. Special areas of focus include the ascendancy of conservatism, the retreat of liberalism, rising economic inequality, women's and gay liberation, the expanding role of the media in American politics, the veneration of corporate America, and expressions of such in the era's popular (and sometimes unpopular) culture. The relationship of popular history and collective memory of the 1970s and 1980s with "objective" historical analysis constitutes another area of emphasis. For qualified students, this course may be taken as a 500 level graduate content course. Permission of the instructor is required.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Varies
Yearly Cycle: Varies.

Spring 2023HIS 463A3493TTh2:00pm - 3:15pm(B. Martin)

HIS 490. Seminar in Historical Inquiry. 3 Credit Hours.

For seniors concentrating in History, this seminar provides extensive, practical experience in the craft of historical research and writing. Further, it examines select themes in historiographical and/or philosophical debates concerning history as a special type of knowledge. Requirements include a substantial research paper. Permission of instructor and HIS 273 are required.
Session Cycle: Fall, Spring
Yearly Cycle: Annual.

HIS 497. Directed Study in History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity for students to do independent, in-depth study or research for academic credit. The student works on an individual basis under the direction of a member of the history department. The main requirement of the course is the development of a substantial paper or project. Permission of department chair and faculty member is required.

HIS ST200. Special Topics in History Modern American Civil Rights Movement. 3 Credit Hours.

This course traces the origins and history of the Black freedom struggle from the 1950s through the 1970s. The organizations, leadership, and ideologies of the movement are considered through firsthand accounts, speeches, songs, images, and film. We will consider both the famous figures of the movement as well as the contributions of countless young people, women, and LGBTQ people. Finally, we will consider what has become the “official” narrative of the movement and what has been left out, as well as connections to the Black Lives Matter movement. Readings will emphasize recent scholarship.

HIS ST300. Special Topics in History Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World. 3 Credit Hours.

A history of race and slavery in the Atlantic World between the 15th and 19th centuries, with a particular emphasis on the economic, social, and cultural impact of the trans-atlantic trade in enslaved Africans (a crucial component of 'globalization" during that era) on the development of European-ruled societies in the Americas.
Prerequisites: 200-level History course.

HIS ST304. Special Topics in History World War One: Causes, Courses, and Consequences. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines one of the seminal events of the twentieth century - the First World War. The course will start by examining what factors led not just to a regional conflict but a global conflagration. These factors will include political, cultural, and military considerations. We will then examine the nature of the war experience, both at the front and at home. As the first Total War, World War I left few people untouched in the combatant countries, whether they wore a uniform or not. After an examination of why the war ended when it did and the peacemaking process, the course concludes with a study of the legacy of the war, stretching to the present time.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course
Session Cycle: Fall
Yearly Cycle: Alternate Years.

HIS ST305. Special Topics in History The Space Race: A History. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the evolution of manned space flight over the twentieth century. Starting by looking at the rocket pioneers and continuing through the rocket experiments of the Second World War, the course focuses on the Cold War rivalry that culminated in the America moonwalks. The course finishes with a look at an under-examined side of how the US got men into space: the human computers who were integral to the understanding of orbital dynamics, and especially the African-American women who played a central role in that effort.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course.

Summer 2022HIS ST305A4132MTWThF11:00am - 12:30pm(R. Bobroff)

HIS ST400. Special Topics in History Foundations of the Modern Middle East. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the foundations necessary for understanding the modern Middle East. We start with a framework that includes foundational elements such as the Abrahamic Faiths, the establishment of the Kingdom of Israel, the Babylonian Captivity, the Rise of Islam, the early Caliphates, the Sunni-Shia Split, the Crusades, the Ottoman Empire, and the British Mandate of Palestine. With this background in place, the last third of the course we will turn to The Arab-Israeli conflict, which is one of the longest and most intractable conflicts in the world. We will discuss the emergence of Zionism and Arab nationalism in the nineteenth century. By examining the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict, its development over time, the major events that have shaped it, and the contrasting narratives about these events, students will gain a better understanding of the dynamics and complexities of the conflict.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course.

Spring 2023HIS ST400A3494MWF1:00pm - 1:50pm(J. Pearson)

HIS ST401. Special Topics in History War Crimes in World History. 3 Credit Hours.

The course explores the global history of war crimes and the legal response to them. It traces human efforts to limit warfare, from codes of war in antiquity designed to maintain a religiously conceived cosmic order to the gradual use in the modern age of the criminal trial as a means of enforcing universal norms. The course locates the evolution of the law of war in the interplay between different cultures. While showing that no single philosophical idea underlay the law of war, the course demonstrates that war in global civilization has rarely been an anarchic free-for-all. Rather, from its beginnings warfare has been has been subject to certain constraints defined by the unique needs and cosmological understandings of their cultures.
Prerequisites: 200-level history course, sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

Spring 2023HIS ST401A3971TTh9:30am - 10:45am(K. Daly)